Internet – Gesellschaft – Kulturen        
DI, 04.04.2017, 16.00 Uhr: Zunächst bringen SchülerInnen der 2EK der HAK Polgarstraße Beiträge zu Catfishing, Snapchat und bargeldloser Bezahlung. Weiters erklären sie die Unterschiede zwischen Deep Web und Dark Net und zeigen deren Gefahren auf. Und wer an neuen Weltuntergangstheorien interessiert ist, kann zwischen mehreren, äußerst kreativen Szenarien auswählen. Weiter geht’s mit SchülerInnen derselben Schule […]
          Rund um das Thema Internet        
SchülerInnen der 2EK der HAK Polgarstraße bringen Beiträge zu Catfishing, Snapchat und bargeldloser Bezahlung. Weiters erklären sie die Unterschiede zwischen Deep Web und Dark Net und zeigen deren Gefahren auf. Und wer an neuen Weltuntergangstheorien interessiert ist, kann zwischen mehreren, äußerst kreativen Szenarien auswählen. hakpo004, pol004
          The dark side of credit card theft        
Cybercriminals have set up highly developed businesses in the shady world of the 'dark net'. Dr Karl explains how they make money from stolen credit cards.
          Front Porch Books: August 2017 edition        


The Age of Perpetual Light
by Josh Weil
(Grove/Atlantic)

I look forward to a new Josh Weil book like Donald Trump looks forward to a 2 a.m. Tweet (though my anticipation is decidedly less malicious in intent). From the time I read his debut collection of novellas, The New Valley, to the dazzling dystopian epic novel, The Great Glass Sea, Weil has bound me in a beautiful spiderweb of words. He burrows deep into his characters and, like the cleverest of spiders, draws me closer and closer to the center, where I die in ecstasy. And now comes this new book of stories. From the title to the cover design to the story about an Amish woman discovering the wonders of electricity, light—both manmade and divine—guides us forward into this brilliant fiction.

Jacket Copy:  Following his debut novel, The Great Glass Sea, Josh Weil brings together stories selected from a decade of work in a stellar new collection. Beginning at the dawn of the past century, in the early days of electrification, and moving into an imagined future in which the world is lit day and night, The Age of Perpetual Light follows deeply-felt characters through different eras in American history: from a Jewish dry goods peddler who falls in love with an Amish woman while showing her the wonders of an Edison Lamp, to a 1940 farmers’ uprising against the unfair practices of a power company; a Serbian immigrant teenage boy in 1990’s Vermont desperate to catch a glimpse of an experimental satellite, to a back-to-the-land couple forced to grapple with their daughter’s autism during winter’s longest night. Brilliantly hewn and piercingly observant, these are tales that speak to the all-too-human desire for advancement and the struggle of wounded hearts to find a salve, no matter what the cost. This is a breathtaking book from one of our brightest literary lights.

Opening Lines:  One by one the windows come alight. From up the hill, I watch: the Hartzlers’ old stone house so dark, so still, it might be the new-turned soil of a garden bed—huge, square, black—and in it the orange lamplight blooming. Bloom, bloom, bloom. Mrs. Hartzler lighting the wicks. There: I can see her shape. It goes window to window, a bee drifting, till it reaches the first floor, again, and goes straight to—where else?—the kitchen. My stomach moans. I suck in my gut, tug the rucksack’s belt more tight. On my shoulders I shrug the straps a little higher. Down I start toward the farm.

Blurbworthiness:  â€œJosh Weil is a lamplighter, the best possible kind. He moves us into each of these earthy, elegant stories and suddenly the light changes in ways we couldn’t have imagined. The Age of Perpetual Light is a special book woven with generosity and grit as it works against the dark to take the true measure of kinship.”  (Ron Carlson, author of Return to Oakpine)



The Grip of It
by Jac Jemc
(Farrar, Straus and Giroux)

I’m going to start building this year’s Halloween reading list with Jac Jemc’s new novel right at the top. From the mad-seeming black-marker scrawl on the front cover and the equally-childlike drawings of screaming heads overlaid on the cover in a near-transparent layer (tilt the book to see the faces in the light) to a groaning haunted house, The Grip of It is the book to prickle my skin with unease this autumn.

Jacket Copy:  Touring their prospective suburban home, Julie and James are stopped by a noise. Deep and vibrating, like throat singing. Ancient, husky, and rasping, but underwater. “That’s just the house settling,” the real estate agent assures them with a smile. He is wrong. The move―prompted by James’s penchant for gambling and his general inability to keep his impulses in check―is quick and seamless; both Julie and James are happy to start afresh. But this house, which sits between a lake and a forest, has its own plans for the unsuspecting couple. As Julie and James try to establish a sense of normalcy, the home and its surrounding terrain become the locus of increasingly strange happenings. The framework― claustrophobic, riddled with hidden rooms within rooms―becomes unrecognizable, decaying before their eyes. Stains are animated on the wall―contracting, expanding―and map themselves onto Julie’s body in the form of painful, grisly bruises. Like the house that torments the troubled married couple living within its walls, The Grip of It oozes with palpable terror and skin-prickling dread. Its architect, Jac Jemc, meticulously traces Julie and James’s unsettling journey through the depths of their new home as they fight to free themselves from its crushing grip.

Opening Lines:  Maybe we move in and we don’t hear the intonation for a few days. Maybe we hear it as soon as we unlock the door. Maybe we drag our friends and family into the house and ask them to hear it and they look into the distance and listen as we try to describe it and fail. “You don’t hear it? It’s like a mouth harp. Deep twang. Like throat singing. Ancient. Glottal. Resonant. Husky and rasping, but underwater.” Alone in the house, though, we become less aware of it, like a persistent, dull headache. Deaf to the sound, until the still silence of ownership settles over us. Maybe we decide we will try to like the noise. Maybe we find comfort in it. Maybe an idea insists itself more easily than an action.

Blurbworthiness:  â€œI mean this in the best possible way: Jac Jemc gives me the creeps. The Grip of It deserves a spot on the shelf beside Shirley Jackson’s The Haunting of Hill House, Henry James’ The Turn of the Screw, and Mark Danielewski’s House of Leaves―not only because it is a masterful haunted house story, but because it, like its literary predecessors, is elegantly written, psychologically rich, and damn terrifying.” (Benjamin Percy, author of The Dark Net)



The Shape of Ideas
by Grant Snider
(Abrams Comicarts)

I have a very short shelf of inspirational books about writing and creativity; right now, the only other residents are Still Writing by Dani Shapiro and On Writing by Stephen King. To that shelf, I am joyfully adding a new member: The Shape of Ideas by Grant Snider, creator of the equally-fabulous Incidental Comics. I am only about one-third of the way through this “Illustrated Exploration of Creativity,” but I am taking it slow because smart, beautiful books like this deserve to be savored. The Shape of Ideas is divided into chapters with headings like Inspiration, Perspiration, Aspiration, Contemplation, Pure Elation and other wonderful “-ation” words. Snider is inventive, witty, forthright, and, yes, inspirational. I am hereby declaring this is the Gift Book of the Year for all creators in your life. It is for everyone who, according to Snider in his Dear Reader note, has ever been mocked “for carrying a notebook to bars, restaurants, and children’s birthday parties,” and those who “have been glared at in class or during an important meeting for aimlessly doodling on scrap paper.” Snider is quick to point out The Shape of Ideas won’t help you tap into a bottomless well of creativity (a non-existent well, he says), but it will provide the kind of long-lasting, deep-drilled inspiration that will keep you going when you think all wells have run dry. Want one more scrap of encouragement before you dip your pen in the ink? In addition to being a world-class illustrator, Snider has a full-time day job as an orthodontist. Dentist by day, artist by night. That kind of dedication, perspiration, and aspiration makes me smile.

Jacket Copy:  What does an idea look like? And where do they come from? Grant Snider’s illustrations will motivate you to explore these questions, inspire you to come up with your own answers and, like all Gordian knots, prompt even more questions. Whether you are a professional artist or designer, a student pursuing a creative career, a person of faith, someone who likes walks on the beach, or a dreamer who sits on the front porch contemplating life, this collection of one- and two-page comics will provide insight into the joys and frustrations of creativity, inspiration, and process—no matter your age or creative background.

Opening Lines:

Blurbworthiness:  â€œGrant Snider’s work delivers introspection, humor, and inspiration in visually stunning drawings. They are a colorful look into the creative process—from the moments of quiet contemplation to the days of frenzied desperation.”  (Susan Cain author of Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking)



The Standard Grand
by Jay Baron Nicorvo
(St. Martin’s Press)

Some of the best war literature doesn’t involve bullets, blood, or bombs, but centers around what happens to warriors after they redeploy. Think The Yellow Birds by Kevin Powers, Be Safe I Love You by Cara Hoffman, Redeployment by Phil Klay, and Tim O’Brien’s short story “Speaking of Courage” from The Things They Carried. When you’re in the midst of the fog of war, it’s hard to think; the contemplation—and the nightmares—often don’t hit full force until after you’re back among the uncomfortable comforts of home. That’s one reason I’m looking forward to reading Jay Baron Nicorvo’s The Standard Grand; the other is the dazzling and inventive plot which involves an AWOL vet, a cougar, a resort in the Catskills and Senator Al Franken. Good things wait for us in these pages, dear reader.

Jacket Copy:  When an Army trucker goes AWOL before her third deployment, she ends up sleeping in Central Park. There, she meets a Vietnam vet and widower who inherited a tumbledown Borscht Belt resort. Converted into a halfway house for homeless veterans, the Standard―and its two thousand acres over the Marcellus Shale Formation―is coveted by a Houston-based multinational company. Toward what end, only a corporate executive knows. With three violent acts at its center―a mauling, a shooting, a mysterious death decades in the past―and set largely in the Catskills, The Standard Grand spans an epic year in the lives of its diverse cast: a female veteran protagonist, a Mesoamerican lesbian landman, a mercenary security contractor keeping secrets and seeking answers, a conspiratorial gang of combat vets fighting to get peaceably by, and a cougar―along with appearances by Sammy Davis, Jr. and Senator Al Franken. All of the characters―soldiers, civilians―struggle to discover that what matters most is not that they’ve caused no harm, but how they make amends for the harm they’ve caused. Jay Baron Nicorvo’s The Standard Grand confronts a glaring cultural omission: the absence of women in our war stories. Like the best of its characters―who aspire more to goodness than greatness―this American novel hopes to darn a hole or two in the frayed national fabric.

Opening Lines:  Specialist Smith gunned the gas and popped the clutch in the early Ozark morning. Her Dodge pickup yelped, slid to one side in the blue dark, then shot fishtailing forward. The rear tires burned a loud ten meters of smoking, skunky rubber out front of the stucco ranch house on Tidal Road.
       She felt thankful for her bad marriage. It allowed her the privilege of living off base; she could go AWOL without having to bust the gates of Fort Leonard Wood. Her four-barrel pocket pepperbox, a COP .357—holstered, unloaded—rode on the passenger seat.

Blurbworthiness:  â€œWith profound compassion for his outrageously wonderful characters, Nicorvo brings readers to a defunct and decaying Catskills resort where a ghost platoon of vets are surviving among dangers both natural and human-made. Insanely funny, by turns tragic and, ultimately, redemptive, The Standard Grand is a desperate masterpiece of a debut: honest, epic, constantly surprising, and relentlessly entertaining.”  (Bonnie Jo Campbell, author of American Salvage)



Crossings
by Jon Kerstetter
(Crown)

Another promising book about war landed on my doorstep this month and has promptly hooked me inside its pages. Like The Standard Grand, the memoir Crossings reminds us that battles are not fought by faceless robots bent on clinical killing but by men and women with bodies that can bleed and souls that can break. Army physician Jon Kerstetter volunteered for duty in Rwanda, Kosovo, and Bosnia and served three combat tours in Iraq. And then he came home and suffered a stroke. See, no robots here. The military may pride itself on its weaponized machinery, but its heart is still made of flesh and blood.

Jacket Copy:  Every juncture in Jon Kerstetter’s life has been marked by a crossing from one world into another: from civilian to doctor to soldier; between healing and waging war; and between compassion and hatred of the enemy. When an injury led to a stroke that ended his careers as a doctor and a soldier, he faced the most difficult crossing of all, a recovery that proved as shattering as war itself. Crossings is a memoir of an improbable, powerfully drawn life, one that began in poverty on the Oneida Reservation in Wisconsin but grew by force of will to encompass a remarkable medical practice. Trained as an emergency physician, Kerstetter’s thirst for intensity led him to volunteer in war-torn Rwanda, Kosovo, and Bosnia, and to join the Army National Guard. His three tours in the Iraq War marked the height of the American struggle there. The story of his work in theater, which involved everything from saving soldiers’ lives to organizing the joint U.S.–Iraqi forensics team tasked with identifying the bodies of Saddam Hussein’s sons, is a bracing, unprecedented evocation of a doctor’s life at war. But war was only the start of Kerstetter’s struggle. The stroke he suffered upon returning from Iraq led to serious cognitive and physical disabilities. His years-long recovery, impeded by near-unbearable pain and complicated by PTSD, meant overcoming the perceived limits of his body and mind and re-imagining his own capacity for renewal and change. It led him not only to writing as a vocation but to a deeper understanding of how healing means accepting a new identity, and how that acceptance must be fought for with as much tenacity as any battlefield victory.

Opening Lines:  A soldier lies in the sand, blood pooling beneath his head, mouth gulping at the air. His eyes fixed, head tilted off to one side, legs and arms motionless. He’s a young soldier in his early twenties, late teens, a young man who should be a freshman in college or finding a summer job while deciding what to do after high school. In less than five minutes he’ll probably die right there in the dirt, right at your feet. You will carry his bloodstains on your boots and on the sleeves of your uniform.

Blurbworthiness:  â€œThe author’s emergence as a military doctor makes for interesting reading...but what is of greatest value in this narrative is Kerstetter’s ongoing, twofold recovery from a stroke on one hand and PTSD on the other...The author’s medical perspective on his own condition and critical therapeutic moments adds depth to an already solid story. An inspiring memoir.”  (Kirkus Reviews)


Fresh Complaint
by Jeffrey Eugenides
(Farrar, Straus and Giroux)

Jeffrey Eugenides’ short story collection—his first in a writing career which began in 1993 with The Virgin Suicides—is a virtually gallery of great opening lines. I won’t list them all here—apart from the book’s very first lines (see below)—but as one example, here’s the bold, funny start to “Baster,” which originally appeared in The New Yorker:
The recipe came in the mail:

Mix semen of three men.
Stir vigorously.
Fill turkey baster.
Recline.
Insert nozzle.
Squeeze.

Ingredients:
1 pinch Stu Wadsworth
1 pinch Jim Freeson
1 pinch Wally Mars

There was no return address but Tomasina knew who had sent it: Diane, her best friend and, recently, fertility specialist.
Now, that’s funny stuff. The rest of the collection promises even more smart hilarity. No complaints here.

Jacket Copy:  Jeffrey Eugenides’s bestselling novels have shown him to be an astute observer of the crises of adolescence, self-discovery, family love, and what it means to be American in our times. The stories in Fresh Complaint explore equally rich­­––­­and intriguing­­––territory. Ranging from the bitingly reproductive antics of “Baster” to the dreamy, moving account of a young traveler’s search for enlightenment in “Air Mail” (selected by Annie Proulx for Best American Short Stories), this collection presents characters in the midst of personal and national emergencies. We meet a failed poet who, envious of other people’s wealth during the real-estate bubble, becomes an embezzler; a clavichordist whose dreams of art founder under the obligations of marriage and fatherhood; and, in “Fresh Complaint,” a high school student whose wish to escape the strictures of her immigrant family lead her to a drastic decision that upends the life of a middle-aged British physicist. Narratively compelling, beautifully written, and packed with a density of ideas despite their fluid grace, these stories chart the development and maturation of a major American writer.

Opening Lines:  Coming up the drive in the rental car, Cathy sees the sign and has to laugh. “Wyndham Falls. Gracious Retirement Living.”
       Not exactly how Della has described it.
       The building comes into view next. The main entrance looks nice enough. It’s big and glassy, with white benches outside and an air of medical orderliness. But the garden apartments set back on the property are small and shabby. Tiny porches, like animal pens. The sense, outside the curtained windows and weather-beaten doors, of lonely lives within.


Front Porch Books is a monthly tally of books—mainly advance review copies (aka “uncorrected proofs” and “galleys”)—I’ve received from publishers. Because my dear friends, Mr. FedEx and Mrs. UPS, leave them with a doorbell-and-dash method of delivery, I call them my Front Porch Books. In this digital age, ARCs are also beamed to the doorstep of my Kindle via NetGalley and Edelweiss. Note: many of these books won’t be released for another 2-6 months; I’m here to pique your interest and stock your wish lists. Cover art and opening lines may change before the book is finally released. I should also mention that, in nearly every case, I haven’t had a chance to read these books.



          New Next Week on August 1, 2017        

The following titles will be released next week. Select any title to learn more or to request a copy. Be sure to visit our Hot Titles webpage for more exciting upcoming titles.

Cover art for The Address Cover art for Are You SleepingCover art for Beauty Like the Night Cover art for The Bedlam Stacks Cover art for The Blinds Cover art for A Boy in Winter Cover art for The Clockwork Dynasty Cover art for The Cooking Gene Cover art for The Cottingley Secret Cover art for Crime Scene Cover art for The Dark Net Cover art for Dead on Arrival Cover art for Devil's Cut Cover art for The Dying Game Cover art for Girl in Snow Cover art for Gone Gull Cover art for The Half Drowned King Cover art for Holding Cover art for The Hot One Cover art for It's Not Yet Dark Cover art for A Killer Harvest Cover art for Lights on Rats Out Cover art for Map of the Heart Cover art for Mrs. Fletcher Cover art for A Nest of Vipers Cover art for New People Cover art for Nothing Stays Buried Cover art for On Her Majesty's Frightfully Secret Service Cover art for The Ready- Made Thief Cover art for The Seventh Function of Language Cover art for Shadow Girl Cover art for Shadow of the Lions Cover art for Stasi Child Cover art for Unfu*k Yourself Cover art for What Made Maddy Run Cover art for A Woman's Place is at the Top Cover art for Yesterday


          "Mr Robot", & les hackers, super-héros des temps modernes (et pourquoi Hollywood les adore)        

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Voix off sur fondu noir. "Bonjour mon ami. Bonjour mon ami? C'est faible. Peut-être que je devrais te donner un nom, mais c'est une pente glissante. Tu es seulement dans ma tête. Tu dois t'en rappeler. Merde! C'est en train d'arriver. Je parle à une personne imaginaire". Petit uppercut dès l'entrée en matière, révélatrice...

Durant ces derniers jours, j'ai dégusté, puis dévoré, dans un de ces accès de binge-watching qui deviennent la norme dans notre "consommation" de la culture, la première saison d'une nouvelle série, dont bon nombre de geeks de mon entourage parlent en cette rentrée, alors qu'elle n'est même pas (pas encore ?) diffusée en France. Mr Robot : c'est la plongée dans l'enfer psychotique d'un nerd absolu, un hacker révolté, radical. En juin dernier, USA Networks a commencé à diffuser la première saison de cette série, Mr Robot, récompensée au très hype festival SXSW. La série a été réalisée par Sam Esmail, et produite par United Cable ainsi que Anonymous Content (admirez le clin d'eil)...

Le pitch: un jeune new-yorkais réservé, entre anxiété sociale et dépression, Elliot Alderson (Rami Malek, acteur méconnu, génial) développeur hyperdoué dans une grosse société de sécurité informatique (Allsafe) le jour, hacker-voyeur-justicier la nuit, va se retrouver embringué par une bande de hackers radicaux, par ailleurs militants hacktivistes (qui renvoient bien sûr aux Anonymous) au sein d'un mystérieux groupe, Fsociety. Un groupe dirigé par Edward Alderson, alias "Mr Robot" (Christian Slater). Ils veulent détruire les infrastructures des plus grosses banques et entreprises du monde, notamment le conglomérat tentaculaire E Corp (qu'il surnomme Evil Corp), où l'on peut voir un mélange de Enron, Microsoft et Google. Avec cet idéal volontiers libertaire, "casser" le système informatique de la multinationale, et ainsi libérer tous les particuliers de leurs dettes... Cela va marcher, bien au-delà de leurs espérances, au point d'entraîner des soulèvements populaires. La série multiplie les références geeks : comme chez Tarantino, les pirates de Fsociety ont des dialogues truffés de référances pour initiés ("je dois naviguer à travers un répertoire de structure en mode Tron", "Mon subconscient tournant en tâche de fond me faisait douter de ce que j'avais fait croire à tous les autres", lâche Elliot). Voilà pour résumer. Je ne vais pas jouer les spoilers sur cette série que j'ai trouvée brillante, radicale, provocatrice (peut-être trop pour qu'elle trouve un diffuseur chez nos diffuseurs française ?), malgré quelques facilités dans le scénario.

Assurément, Mr Robot consacre un nouveau type de super-héros des temps modernes, équipé de sa cape et son épée virtuels : le hacker. Et j'y reviendrai, mais Hollywood adore : il a besoin en permanence de nouveaux héros autour desquels broder des storytellings qui vont faire rêver les foules... De quoi ringardiser les vieux super-héros qui donnent des films cheap à (trop) gros budget. Qu'est-ce qui colle mieux à notre époque déstabilisée q'un héros solitaire, rebelle, névrosé, et shooté à sa vie numérique ?

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C'est bien le personnage de Elliot qui est au cœur de la série : tout se déroule de son point de vue, il commente parfois en voix off, voire, semble prendre à témoin nous, les téléspectateurs, dans certaines séquences. Elliot donc, est en résumé "différent", n'accepte qu'a minima les codes de la vie en société et en entreprise, a une vie numérique cachée, solitaire, a ses névroses (qui deviendront centrales au fil de la série), ses addictions, a des opinions politiques radicales (tendance gauche libertaire)... Mais il se veut justicier, appliquant la justice à sa manière dans la vie numérique. Car il dispose de compétences rares et peu connues, comme prodige de l'informatique, capable d'accéder aux profondeurs du Dark Net - de quoi faire fantasmer le commun des mortels, et, là encore, Hollywood...

"Je ne sais pas comment parler aux gens"

Portrait-robot de notre jeune (anti)-héros donc, qui possède nombre de caractéristiques du hacker (et nerd)-type: l'adaptation au monde du travail et la vie sociale n'ont rien de naturel pour lui. Son boss, plutôt bienveillant à son égard, l'enjoint à ôter son hoodie (costume-type du nerd depuis Mark Zuckerberg) pour être sagement en chemise sur son lieu de travail. Sa meilleure amie, dans la même boîte que lui, tente vaimeent de le convertir au bases de la vie sociale en l'invitant régulièrement aux pots after-work avec d'autres jeunes dans le bar du coin. Souvent, il renonce au moment de franchir la porte du bar. D'ailleurs, Elliot l'avoue: "je ne sais pas comment parler aux gens".

Sa vision de la société est radicale : il n'a pas de page Facebook, qu'il hait, car "les réseaux sociaux gros plan sur un fil Twitter consistent à se spammer les uns les autres avec nos communautés de m***, en se faisant passer pour un fake, sur les réseaux sociaux qui nous volent notre intimité". Steve Jobs, héros des geeks, "s'est fait des millions de dollars sur le dos d'enfants" images d'une keynote de Steve Jobs,.... "C'est pas parce que les Hunger Games nous rendent heureux, mais parce qu'on veut être sous sédatifs. (...) J'emmerde la société!", lâche Elliott à sa psy.

Il y a d'ailleurs des fulgurances dans la série, sous le prisme de la dénonciation de la fausse transparence des réseaux sociaux : à un moment donné (épisode 3), il lâche: "Et si on affichait le code-source pour les gens aussi ? Les gens aimeraient-ils voir?..." Et cette séquence surréaliste où il imagine les employés de son bureau portant des pancartes sont placardés leurs secrets inavouables... Des fulgurances qui rendent la série radicale, en se référant clairement à Fight Club de David Funcher (1999).

Il a une haine certaine des multinationales, de 'Evil Corp', des puissants, qui forment à ses yeux une secte secrète, "un groupe puissant de gens secrètement en train de contrôler le monde".

Il a un secret obsessionnel, une addiction: il hacke tous les gens de son entourage: amis, collègues... Evidemment, il excelle dans le hacking, ce qui lui servira au de Fsociety, allant jusqu'à hacker un parking, à se créer une fausse page Wikipedia pour intègre le siège des serveurs de E Corp, ou encore une prison en piratant à distance le portable t'un flic posté à l'entrée... Parfois pour jouer les justiciers - autre caractéristique de la culture hacker (référence aux Anonymous...), comme menacer l'amant infidèle de sa psy. C'est d'ailleurs pour jouer les justiciers qu'il s'embarquera dans l'aventure Fsociety, pour mettre à genoux 'Evil Corp'. A un moment donné (épisode 3), il fixe le téléspectateur, affirmant "J'ai bien droit à quelques erreurs, je suis sur le point de changer le monde". Avec ce côté noir et blanc propre à tout hacker ( Black hat & White hat), à la fois "gentil" qui veut améliorer la sécurité informatique pour le bien de l'Humanité (car le hacher est souvent idéaliste), et "méchant" qui utilise se compétences à des fins criminelles.

Le hacker, ce rebelle du Dark Net qu'Hollywood adore

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Assurément, le hacker est hype. Un reflet de la société, et d'un certain syndrome de Stockholm auquel semble être en proie l'industrie de l'entertainment US. En novembre 2014, alors que USA Network commandait à Sam Esmail les 10 épisodes de la série, Sony Pictures était victime d'un piratage des mails de ses dirigeants par le collectif Guardians of Peace, dévoilant caprices de stars et blagues de mauvais aloi. Quatre mois plus tôt, les comptes iCloud de dizaines de people étaient hackés par un sale gosse, et les photos de Kate Upton et autres Kirsten Dunst circulaient sur 4chan et Reddit... La série Mr Robot est aussi imprégnée des mouvements comme le Printemps arabe en 2010 - 2011 et le rôle des réseaux sociaux (le réalisateur Sam Esmail est égyptien), Occupy Wall Street en 2011 qui fustige le monde de la finance, ou encore le piratage du site de rencontres extraconjugal Ashley Madison en juillet 2015.

Il y a quelques années encore, le hacker vu par Hollywood était cet ado boutonneux et bidouilleur à lunettes, cantonné à des seconds rôles. Puis il devient un héros, tant dans la société que les médias. Edward Snowden (consacré dans le documentaire Citizenfour, sorti en 2014), est devenu la star intègre des lanceurs d'alerte (une nouvelle race de hackers intègres qui risquent leur vie au nom de la vérité...), comme le plus ambigü Julian Assange. Dans le dernier James Bond, Skyfall, on a vu réapparaître Q (vous savez, l'inventeur) sous les traits d'un jeune geek hacker sexy.

"Black hat, white hat", hacker freak, et cyber justicier

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Le hacker le plus connu est bien sûr Lisbeth Salander (une femme, enfin), personnage central de la saga Millenium (dont le tome 4 cartonne): la punkette gothique sombre, un brin hardcore, passée par la case hôpitaux psychiatriques, aide le journaliste dans son enquête par sa propre investigation en ligne grâce au hacking. Elle aussi, elle a ce côté un peu freak où elle a une difficulté à interagir avec l'autre, et manie donc mieux le clavier que les relations humaines. Comme Elliot de Mr Robot. Ou encore comme Jess dans la série TV dystopique The Code (diffusée par Arte ce printemps), dont on comprendra au fil de la série qu'il est atteint du syndrome d'Asperger, une forme d'autisme qui serait propre aux nerds.

C'est justement un hacker que Michael Mann a mis en scène dans son dernier polar subtil, Hacker (Blackhat, en VO, sorti en mars 2015), Nicholas Hathaway, un pirate informatique qui purge une peine de prison, et est libéré s'il accepte de collaborer avec le FBI et le gouvernement chinois pour démasquer le coupable d'une attaque informatique contre une centrale nucléaire chinoise... Le héros solitaire est donc confronté à un ennemi virtuel, une nouvelle Mafia numérique qui menace de détruire une centrale. Michael Mann représente comme personne ce nouveau virus virtuel, qui circule dans une multitude de circuits informatiques...

Cela fait longtemps que Hollywood représente le hacker comme justicier masqué, tel un nouveau Batman. Depuis la mythique saga 80s Tron, ou encore Matrix, et bien sûr Guy Fawkes dans V for Vendetta, ce collectif de justiciers - bientôt rattrapé par la réalité, lorsque les Anonymous, au début des années 2000, en viennent revêtir son masque. Masque de justicier grimaçant qui est réapparu dans Mr Robot.


          Jigsaw Resurrected        

Over the past few weeks there has been an uptick on one dark net forum on the selling of the Jigsaw ransomware. Some may know Jigsaw as BitcoinBlackmailer, CrytoHitMan, Invisible Empire, BitcoinStealer, or Epic. A quick look on the online malware analysis site VirusTotal also shows a higher than usual rate of submissions in the …

The post Jigsaw Resurrected appeared first on McAfee Blogs.


          Novedad: The Dark Net, de Benjamin Percy        
Esta semana se ha puesto a la venta The Dark Net, la nueva novela de Benjamin Percy. Esta es su sinopsis:
The dark net is an online shadowland for criminals to operate anonymously, but when a demonic force begins to hack the minds of its users there is nowhere left to hide. 
Twelve-year-old Hannah has been fitted with a high-tech prosthetic that restores her sight, but can't understand why she can now see shadows surrounding certain people.
Lela, an emotionally shut-off, technophobic journalist stumbles onto a story nobody wants her to uncover. A story someone will kill to keep hidden. 
A former evangelist, Mike, suffers demons - figurative and literal - and keeps an arsenal of weapons stored in the basement of the homeless shelter he runs. 
And Derek, is a hacker who believes himself a soldier, part of a cyber army dedicated to changing the world for the better. 
With the virus spreading throughout the net and an ancient evil threatening to break lose on the real world, it falls to these strangers to stop the rising darkness. 
THE DARK NET is a cracked-mirror version of the digital nightmare we already live in, a timely and wildly imaginative techno-thriller about the evil that lurks in real and virtual spaces, and the power of a united few to fight back.

          New Next Week on August 1, 2017        

The following titles will be released next week. Select any title to learn more or to request a copy. Be sure to visit our Hot Titles webpage for more exciting upcoming titles.

Cover art for The Address Cover art for Are You SleepingCover art for Beauty Like the Night Cover art for The Bedlam Stacks Cover art for The Blinds Cover art for A Boy in Winter Cover art for The Clockwork Dynasty Cover art for The Cooking Gene Cover art for The Cottingley Secret Cover art for Crime Scene Cover art for The Dark Net Cover art for Dead on Arrival Cover art for Devil's Cut Cover art for The Dying Game Cover art for Girl in Snow Cover art for Gone Gull Cover art for The Half Drowned King Cover art for Holding Cover art for The Hot One Cover art for It's Not Yet Dark Cover art for A Killer Harvest Cover art for Lights on Rats Out Cover art for Map of the Heart Cover art for Mrs. Fletcher Cover art for A Nest of Vipers Cover art for New People Cover art for Nothing Stays Buried Cover art for On Her Majesty's Frightfully Secret Service Cover art for The Ready- Made Thief Cover art for The Seventh Function of Language Cover art for Shadow Girl Cover art for Shadow of the Lions Cover art for Stasi Child Cover art for Unfu*k Yourself Cover art for What Made Maddy Run Cover art for A Woman's Place is at the Top Cover art for Yesterday


          The Kronos Needle in the AlphaBay Haystack        
When looked at all the sales on dark net marketplace AlphaBay, it looks all the more remarkable that the Feds prioritized indicting and arresting Marcus Hutchins within the month after taking down AlphaBay.
          Watch the new trailer for ‘Ozark,’ the dark Netflix drama starring Jason Bateman as a dad on the run from a drug lord        

Jason bateman on ozark

Jason Bateman is back on Netflix, but this time it's not with the Bluth family — and it's definitely not a comedy. 

He's stars alongside Laura Linney in  "Ozark," and Netflix just released a gripping new trailer. 

Bateman plays Marty, a financial planner, and Linney plays his wife, Wendy. They suddenly uproot their family from the suburbs of Chicago to a resort community in the Missouri Ozarks (hey, that's the title of the show!). And it turns out they're on the run from a drug lord.

Things look like they get really dark over the 10-episode first season, and unfortunately for Marty, there's definitely no money hidden in any banana stands.

Set to debut on July 21, "Ozark" is the first series regular role for Bateman since "Arrested Development." It's also Linney's first TV role since Showtime's "The Big C" ended in 2013. Chris Mundy ("Hell on Wheels," "Criminal Minds") serves as the showrunner. 

Watch the new trailer for "Ozark" below:

SEE ALSO: The 18 most exciting new TV shows you'll want to watch

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: Netflix and Marvel just dropped the first 'The Defenders' trailer — and it looks amazing


          The Strange Bird - an excerpt from Jeff VanderMeer's new Borne story        

The Storm

Headed ever southeast across the vast desert, the Strange Bird thought the world below looked so very old and so very worn, and only when she climbed to the right altitude could she pretend that it was beautiful.

The Strange Bird tried not to think of her dreams as she flew, for she could make no sense of them, hardly knew what a dream was, for it did not fit her internal lexicon and she had trouble holding in her head the idea of real and not-real.

Any more than did the prowling holograms that swirled up across the dead desert surface from time to time, performing subroutines from times so remote that nothing about them could be said to contain sense. Human figures welled up to walk, yet were composed of nothing but light. Sometimes they wore special contamination suits or astronaut suits. They trudged or they ran across the sands as if real, and then dissipated, and then came back into existence in the position where they had started, to again trudge or run, over and over.

Yet in watching this, the Strange Bird was reminded of the dream, and also of how detritus fell from her to the desert floor. Tiny bits of herself she did not need, and that she did not understand, for the way in which this material left her was too regular to be an accident, and she knew the compass inside her guided its distribution. Each time she regenerated the microscopic part that was lost so she could lose it once more.

Jeff VanderMeer's The Strange Bird: A Borne Story is available from Amazon.

In the laboratory, the scientists had taken samples from her weekly. She had lost something of herself every day. It was worse when they added something on, and then the Strange Bird had felt awkward, as if adjusting to an extra weight, and lurched off-balance on her perch, flapped her wings for hours until she felt settled again.

 

On the fifth day, just as the Strange Bird had become comfortable with this process—and the sun, the holograms, the cities, the higher elevations where the wind was so cold—a cloud blotted out the edge of the world, coming fast at her. She had not encountered a storm yet, but knew of storms, something inside of her programmed for evasion. But the cloud came at her too swift, too all-encompassing, and only at the last second did she see why: for it wasn’t a cloud at all but a swarm of emerald beetles, and the chittering sound they made as they flew scared her.

She tried to dive for ground cover but misjudged the distance, and the swarm overtook her like a wall, and she slammed into it, lost control of her wings, fell through a thick squall of beetles, progress slowed by their carapaces, righted herself in time to—head down like a battering ram and eyes shut—push through them even as they tore at her feathers and ripped along her belly.

Breaking free of them on the other side meant a lightness that surprised, and she rose more quickly than expected, caught in a tidal pool of air created by their passage. Thought herself free—only to spy just ahead the reason for the beetles’ panic: a real storm, spanning the horizon, and closing fast.

Emergency systems not triggered by the beetles switched on. A transparent sheath slid over her eyes and echolocation switched off so that she might rely on tracers and infrared in the midst of maelstrom.

Then the storm hit and she had nowhere to hide, no plan, no defenses, just the compass pulsing inside of her, and a body pummeled by winds gusting in all directions, trying only not to crash or be ripped to pieces.

The Strange Bird’s strength failed her, and she tumbled, rose and fell only because the wind willed it. Perhaps she called out before something dark with weight spun toward her out of the maelstrom. Perhaps she made a sound that was a person’s name as it struck her broadside, smashed her into a well of turbulence, knocked the consciousness from her. The Strange Bird could not remember later.

But whom could she have called for help? There was no one to help her, was there?

 

The Prison

 

When the Strange Bird regained consciousness, head ringing, she found herself in a converted prison cell in a building buried in the sand. Only the narrowest foot-long slit of window at the top near the ceiling revealed the presence of the sun. All was dark and all was hard—the bench set into the wall like a long, wide treasure chest was hard. The walls were hard. The black bars, reinforced with wire and planks of wood, so she could not slip out, were hard. No soft surface for relief. No hint of green or of any life to reassure her.

The smell that came to the Strange Bird was of death and decay and untold years of suffering, and the dim-lit view that spread out before her beyond the bars was of a long, low room filled with odd furniture. At the far end an arched doorway led into still more darkness.

The Strange Bird panicked, felt a formless dread. She was back in the laboratory. She could not find her way out. She would never truly see the sky again. Thrashed her wings and screeched and fell off the bench and onto the bare dirt floor and lay there beak open, wings spread out, trying to appear large and fearsome.

Then a light turned on and the gloom lifted and the Strange Bird saw her captor. The one she would come to think of as the Old Man.

He sat atop an overturned bucket next to a rotting desk and watched her, the rest of the long room still murky behind him.

“Beautiful,” the Old Man said. “It is nice to have something beautiful here, in this place.”

The Strange Bird remained silent, for she did not want her captor to know that she understood, nor that she could, when she wished, form human words, even if she did not understand all of those words. Instead, she squawked like a bird and flapped her wings like a bird, while the Old Man admired her. In all ways, she decided to be a bird in front of him. But always, too, she watched him.

The Old Man had become folded in on himself over time. He had brown skin but pink-white splotches on his arms and face, as if something had burned him long ago, tried to strip him away from himself. He had but one eye and this was why when he stared it was with such purpose and intensity. His beard had turned white and so he looked always as if drowning, a froth of sea foam roiling across his chin, and with flecks of white across his burned nose and gaunt cheekbones. He wore thin robes or rags—who could tell which—and a belt to cinch from which hung tools and a long, flat rusted knife.

“I rescued you from the sands. You were buried there—just your head above. The storm had smashed you out of the sky. You are lucky I found you. The foxes and the weasels would have gotten to you. You would be in something’s belly by now. A special meal.”

The Old Man did not resemble a lab scientist to the Strange Bird and did not talk like a scientist, and his home was no laboratory the more she saw of it. She settled down, relaxed enough to search for injury, discovered soreness and strain but no broken bones. Feathers that had been lost but would grow back. She preened, checked for parasites, split two against the edge of her beak, while the man talked.

“My name is Abidugun. I was a carpenter like my father before me and his father. But now I have been many things. Now I am also a writer.” He gestured to a typewriter, ancient, atop the rickety desk. To the Strange Bird it resembled a metal tortoise with its insides on the outside. “Now I am trying to get it all down. Everything must be put down on the paper. Everything. No exceptions.”

The Old Man stared at the Strange Bird as if expecting a response but she had no response.

“I sleep in the cell when I don’t have guests,” the Old Man said. “The prison is all around us and below us—many levels. I was once a prisoner here, long ago, so I know. But that is ancient history. You don’t want to know about that. No one does.”

Although the prison was vast and the wind echoed through its many chambers during sandstorms, the Strange Bird would learn that all the Old Man’s possessions existed in this long room, for it was where he chose to live and the rest was nothing but hauntings to him.

“I am the only one here,” the Old Man said, “and I like it that way. But sometimes having guests is a good idea. You are my guest. Someday I will show you around the grounds here, if you are good. There are rules to being good that I will share.”

Yet he never shared the rules, and the Strange Bird had already seen the three crosses that stood in the sand outside, which she thought were perches for other birds now long dead. She had seen the tiny garden and well next to the crosses, for she turned echolocation back on and cast out her senses like a dark net across a glittering sea to capture whatever lay outside her cell. The well and garden were both a risk, even disguised as abandoned, derelict, overgrown.

“I am Abidugun,” he said again. “You I will call Isadora, for you are the most dazzling bird I have ever seen and you need a dazzling name.”

 

So, for a time, the Strange Bird became Isadora and responded to the name as best she could—when the Old Man fed her scraps, when he decided to read her stories from books, tales incomprehensible to her. She decided that even as she plotted to escape, she would pretend to be a good pet.

But in the lab, the scientists had kept her in a special sort of light that mimicked sunlight and fed her in its way, and now that she had only the barest hint of any light, she felt the lack.

“You should eat more,” the Old Man said, but the kind of food he brought often disgusted her.

“Life is difficult,” the Old Man said. “Everyone says it is. But death is worse.”

And he would laugh, for this was a common refrain, and the Strange Bird believed someone had said it to him and now he was under the spell of those words. Death is worse. Except she did not know anything of death but what she had seen in the laboratory. So she did not know if death was worse. She wished only that she might be that remote from the Earth and the humans who lived upon it. To glide above, to go where she wished without fear because she was too high up. To reduce humans again to the size she preferred: distant ghosts trudging and winking out to reappear again, looped and unimportant.

 

Beyond the dune that hid the Old Man lay a ruined city, vast and confusing and dangerous. Within that city moved the ghostly outlines of monstrous figures the Strange Bird could not interpret from afar, some that lived below the surface and some that strode across the broken places and still others that flew above.

Closer by, etched in the crosshairs of her extra perception . . . a fox, atop the dune, curious and compact and almost like a sentry watching the Old Man’s position. Soon, others joined the fox and she glimpsed the edges of their intent and, intrigued, she would follow them using echolocation whenever she sensed them near, when there was nothing else to do, and for the first time she experienced the sensation of boredom, a word that had meant nothing in the laboratory for there had been nothing to test boredom against. But now she had the blue limitless sky to test it against, and she was already restless.

Her senses also quested down the many tunnels and levels of the prison when the Old Man went hunting, so she might test the bars, the planks of the wood, the wire in his absence. The Old Man often disappeared into the maze down below, with his machete, and hunted long, black weasel-like creatures that lived there. She listened to the distant squeals as he found them and murdered them, and she saw in her mind the bubbles and burrows that were their lives become smaller and smaller until they were not there at all.

How in their evasion and their chittering one to another did the Old Man not realize their intelligence? On the mornings when the Strange Bird woke to find the thin, limp bodies of the black weasels lying half-in, half-out of a massive pot on a table halfway across the room, she felt a sense of loss the Old Man could not share.

The Strange Bird knew, too, that the Old Man might find her beautiful, but should he ever be starving, he would murder her and pluck her dazzling feathers and cook her and eat her, like he would any animal.

She would lie half-in, half-out of the pot, limp and thoughtless, and she would no longer be Isadora but just a strange dead bird.

Excerpted from The Strange Bird: A Borne Story by Jeff VanderMeer

e-book original to be published by MCD x FSG on August 1st, 2017


          The Deep Dark Net        

Introduction: It seems a day doesn’t go by where we are not reading about data breaches, payment fraud, and organized retail crime. Access to the technology and know-how to conduct malicious activity has become more prevalent, and the result has been an exponential increase in the volume of cyber threat incidents. It is estimated that the average annual loss to … Read More

The post The Deep Dark Net appeared first on Jack L. Hayes International, Inc..


          Dark net, la mythologie qui vient        
Comment l'appeler ? Deep net ? Dark net ? Internet profond ? Une chose est sûre, cet "autre" internet, cette zone de non-droit, que dépeignait hier soir Envoyé Spécial dans un reportage saisissant...
          Kristen Tsolis        
Expertise

Spatial Data, Data Integration, Computer Security Response, Data Analytics

Adjunct Professor

Kristen Tsolis is a spatial data analyst and Lecturer at the Naval Postgraduate School. She is one of the founding members of the NPS CORE Lab, a lab focused on visual analytic methodologies and data integration. Kristen holds a Masters in International Policy Studies from the Middlebury Institute of International Studies. She has served as a Visiting Scholar with the Computer Security Response Team (CERT/CC) and is currently pursuing her PhD in Software Engineering with the goal of developing innovative spatial data analytics capabilities. Kristen currently teaches “Geospatial and Temporal Aspects of Dark Networks” and has also taught “Computer Networking”, “Systems Analysis and Design”, and labs for “Computer Attack and Defense”.


          Hackers steal US $30 million of cryptocurrency Ethereum        
Cryptocurrencies like Ethereum are vital in the operation of dark net markets. They're completely anonymous, meaning that the purchase of illegal goods can be untraceable. But the currency is also completely unregulated, decentralised and vulnerable to hackers. And that's recently cost users about $30 million.
          Comment on DTNS 3073 – The Case of Australia v. Math by Rick Huebner        
Tom, I was just listening to DTNS 3073 and thought I'd give a different position on the snarky Australia vs Math topic. I've worked in IT and IT sec for almost 20 years, private sector, public sector, and international law enforcement. My first few points are the common thread of saying that if we "weaken" (and I'll come back to that) encryption through legislation, bad guys will just use stronger, probably open source, encryption. Of course AES 256 and PGP are basically un-crackable unless you get very lucky with current hardware. Of course for organized crime and many terrorist organizations, this would be the case. However, there are many more "dumb" criminals out there than smart ones and while their crimes are not as spectacular as stopping a child porn ring on the dark net, convicting an embezzler is also part of law enforcement and may benefit from a way to decrypt encrypted storage. So, not all criminals are going to know that their encryption tool of choice has a way for law enforcement to decrypt traffic. The second point is the common confusion of what legislatures want and what you and Shannon laughed about as a "back door." There are many encryption mechanisms that allow for multiple keys to decrypt. I did not use the term private key because public key crypto is another issue and systems like WhatsApp don't use public key crypto to encrypt the streaming traffic. They use public key crypto to exchange the symmetric keys to something like AES as you'd never get a phone to use something like 4096 bit keys with public key crypto on live streaming. Anyway, my point is that there are many well regarded systems that allow multiple keys to access strongly encrypted data without weakening the crypto. After all, it is just math. For example, LastPass allows me to create one-time keys to be used if I can't get to my master password. LastPass also allows me to share a key with a family member or my lawyer so that in the event of my death, they can access my data. In fact, that password that I give my lawyer does not have to be changed even if I change my master password. There have been many strong crypto systems over the years that allow for multiple keys to decrypt without any degradation of the strength of the crypto. Now, as for policy and legislation, that's a completely different beast, but the math works just fine for multiple keys to decrypt encrypted traffic going all the way back to at least the original PK Zip. Anyway, love the show and always give you credit for the lunch and luncheon correction. :)
          The Eliott Effect        

One of the major problem I have in discussing the nature of the ongoing crisis and the fate of the industrial society is dispelling the myth of the "immaterial economy". It is, I must say, particularly widespread among French elites, perhaps because, as a nation, we tend to despise manual work. Not so long ago we had a debate in the Municipal Council about the digital economy in Nantes and only my boss raised the tantalium supply issue (as I said, he is myboss), as for our resident Greens, they push for the replacement of paper by computers and tablets.

The idea is that since work done and transmitted by a computer is not tangible, it is entirely the product of the human brain and therefore free. Digital economy could therefore fuel a limitless growth even in an era of widespread energy and raw material shortages.

Nothing could be further removed from the truth, as I was taught in a rather dramatic way.

I happen to be owned by a four-legged black-furred monster called Eliott who enjoys stealing chicken escalopes and leaping on tables at the most inconvenient moment. So that day, I was reading my mails while enjoying an excellent Iranian tea, when the little monster decided it was the right time to run across the table, toppling the mug in the process. The tea poured down on my laptop, which proved to have little taste for even light flavored Iranian blends. It fizzled then went dark, causing the collapse of my personal section of the global network and the loss of a considerable number of digital book, including a highly valuable Chukchi grammar.

To make things worse, I was barely recovering from a nasty and costly break up and the state of my finances was far from optimum, so to replace my computer I had to have an interesting, if somewhat tiring, talk with my banker – I needed a laptop for my political activities so doing without was not an option.

The first lesson of this story is that having a mug of tea too close to your computer when your cat is chasing an imaginary mouse is a bad idea. The second lesson is that the so-called immaterial economy is highly dependent upon very material devices and infrastructures and is very likely to crumble when those devices and infrastructures can no longer be built or maintained.

It is possible to build a computer with XVIIIth century technology, even if it will be costly. The concept was first described in 1795 by J. H. Müller, an engineer in the Hessian army and in 1822 Charles Babbage tried to build a mechanical computer – the difference engine - on behalf of the British government. The stated goal was to produce cheap tables, a time consuming and expensive job then. Unfortunately, the standards were so exacting that Babbage ended up spending twice the price of a ship of the line without producing a working prototype and the government finally killed the project.

Babbage then moved on to another, more complex, project : the analytical engine. The analytical engine, albeit entirely mechanical, was more advanced than the computers of the late forties. It had a “memory” of 16,7 kb and used a programming language akin to assembly language, which allowed for loops and conditional branching. The analytical engine was never built but recent experiments have shown that it could have been with the technology of the time.

The idea may have been even older. At the beginning of the twentieth century, a kind of small-sized mechanical computer, was discovered in the wreck of of a Greek ship from the fourth century BC. It was apparently designed to make astronomical calculations. It seems not to have been the only one of its kind.

Mechanical computers of various kind have been used up to the sixties, mostly for research, military or navigation purposes. Thus, the physicist Henry Fermi used a mechanical computer to model neutron transport and the economist William Phillips designed an hydraulic computer (the Moniac computer) to simulate a national economy.

Mechanical or hydraulic computers have their limitation and I seriously doubt you could play Europa Universalis III on one of them or store your collection of paleo-asiatic grammars in their memory. It is quite possible, however, to perform complex computations with them and that beats doing them by hand.

Mechanical computers are definitely one of those technology we should get through the coming Dark Age. They will be of great use to an ecotechnic society and relatively easy to manufacture in a resource-poor world.

As for build a world-wide-web with them, however... well, it could be possible to build a continent spanning network of canals carrying information for a collection of hydraulic computers, but I feel it would be somehow impractical on a planet where water tends to pour down the sky with very inconvenient regularity.

Digital computer are far more convenient in that matter. The problem is that they require a lot of rare material to be build. Silicium is arguably very common but to purify it to the level it can be seeded with germanium, you need a relatively high technology and a lot of resources. Should you manage to preserve that, you will still need tantalium for condensators and rare earth metals for screens and hard disks, and of course a lot of copper for an awful lot of wires.

To make things worse, your networks have to be maintained and your computer powered. Unlike, for instance, a hydraulic computer, digital computers need continuous inflow of high grade energy to remain useful. In a world where brownouts, then blackouts will become more and more common, this will make their use quite problematic and even outright impossible in some areas.

As the core limits, then withdraws, power availability in peripheral regions to preserve itself, computer use is bound to decline and the digital economy to retreats, until it becomes restricted to a few industrial and political centers. The rest of us will have to do with pens and paper and get the boardgame version of Europa Universalis out of its shelf yes, it was a boardgame at the beginning.)

Besides, neither satellites nor cables are eternal. They are bound to break down at some point and will need to be replaced or repaired. This will become increasingly difficult as the pool of resource and the energy supply available to the society shrinks. When the Soviet Union collapsed, for instance, the Soviet equivalent of the Global Positioning System, Glonass, was neglected by a government, which struggled to pay for its own survival. It quickly fell in disrepair and in 2001 only 6 satellites out of 24 were still in working order. The system has since recovered, has Russia has done, but, but the fate of Glonass shows what happens to complex infrastructure once the society, which has built it can no longer maintain it.

You can expect a similar evolution with the internet. First, the network will become unable to keep up with the rising demand, and price measures will be implemented to limit said demand – there already has been attempts to do so, but governments, afraid of the impact upon the public opinion, have managed to thwart them, so far.

Then, as our ability to maintain our infrastructures declines, accidents will happen and the Eliott effect will fragment the Internet, one cable at the time. My opinion is that the transoceanic cables will be the first to go, isolating whole regions and forcing them to go off-line indefinitely or to organize their own continental version of the Internet; Those localized Internets will then fragment further, due to economic or political crisis, war or accident, losing usefulness at every step of the process. At the end, the Internet will become a collection of unconnected regional networks, with little added value compared to a standard library, and will morph into a mere administrative tool for whatever remains of the local governments.

At some points, most such network fill fall in disrepair and be terminated, as the Minitel (a French precursor of the Internet) will be in a few days from now. Others may linger on, in particularly stable and rich areas until the last digital computers die. Those networks will, however, very different from those we are accustomed to, text-rich rather than pictures rich, and you will be quite unlikely to find your favorite movie on them – yes, even that kind of favorite movie.

For my French readers, it will be reminiscent of the Minitel (and yes, it may include that kind of service) and of the text-based network featured in Avalon. Needless to say, such shrunken networks won't provide the “immaterial” economy with the market it needs to thrive. It is bound to decline along with the Internet, probably specializing in niche activities.

By the way, the Dark Net won't fare any better. The Tor Network, Freenet or the parallel networks used by mafias may be secretive , they rely upon the same highly material infrastructures as the the rest of the web and will fragment as they do, which will incidentally make them far easier to monitor and control.

Then the local equivalent of Eliott will spot a mouse on the other side of the table and begin to leap around... and the rest of us will have to learn to compute with cranks, valves and pumps.

          Front Porch Books: August 2017 edition        


The Age of Perpetual Light
by Josh Weil
(Grove/Atlantic)

I look forward to a new Josh Weil book like Donald Trump looks forward to a 2 a.m. Tweet (though my anticipation is decidedly less malicious in intent). From the time I read his debut collection of novellas, The New Valley, to the dazzling dystopian epic novel, The Great Glass Sea, Weil has bound me in a beautiful spiderweb of words. He burrows deep into his characters and, like the cleverest of spiders, draws me closer and closer to the center, where I die in ecstasy. And now comes this new book of stories. From the title to the cover design to the story about an Amish woman discovering the wonders of electricity, light—both manmade and divine—guides us forward into this brilliant fiction.

Jacket Copy:  Following his debut novel, The Great Glass Sea, Josh Weil brings together stories selected from a decade of work in a stellar new collection. Beginning at the dawn of the past century, in the early days of electrification, and moving into an imagined future in which the world is lit day and night, The Age of Perpetual Light follows deeply-felt characters through different eras in American history: from a Jewish dry goods peddler who falls in love with an Amish woman while showing her the wonders of an Edison Lamp, to a 1940 farmers’ uprising against the unfair practices of a power company; a Serbian immigrant teenage boy in 1990’s Vermont desperate to catch a glimpse of an experimental satellite, to a back-to-the-land couple forced to grapple with their daughter’s autism during winter’s longest night. Brilliantly hewn and piercingly observant, these are tales that speak to the all-too-human desire for advancement and the struggle of wounded hearts to find a salve, no matter what the cost. This is a breathtaking book from one of our brightest literary lights.

Opening Lines:  One by one the windows come alight. From up the hill, I watch: the Hartzlers’ old stone house so dark, so still, it might be the new-turned soil of a garden bed—huge, square, black—and in it the orange lamplight blooming. Bloom, bloom, bloom. Mrs. Hartzler lighting the wicks. There: I can see her shape. It goes window to window, a bee drifting, till it reaches the first floor, again, and goes straight to—where else?—the kitchen. My stomach moans. I suck in my gut, tug the rucksack’s belt more tight. On my shoulders I shrug the straps a little higher. Down I start toward the farm.

Blurbworthiness:  â€œJosh Weil is a lamplighter, the best possible kind. He moves us into each of these earthy, elegant stories and suddenly the light changes in ways we couldn’t have imagined. The Age of Perpetual Light is a special book woven with generosity and grit as it works against the dark to take the true measure of kinship.”  (Ron Carlson, author of Return to Oakpine)



The Grip of It
by Jac Jemc
(Farrar, Straus and Giroux)

I’m going to start building this year’s Halloween reading list with Jac Jemc’s new novel right at the top. From the mad-seeming black-marker scrawl on the front cover and the equally-childlike drawings of screaming heads overlaid on the cover in a near-transparent layer (tilt the book to see the faces in the light) to a groaning haunted house, The Grip of It is the book to prickle my skin with unease this autumn.

Jacket Copy:  Touring their prospective suburban home, Julie and James are stopped by a noise. Deep and vibrating, like throat singing. Ancient, husky, and rasping, but underwater. “That’s just the house settling,” the real estate agent assures them with a smile. He is wrong. The move―prompted by James’s penchant for gambling and his general inability to keep his impulses in check―is quick and seamless; both Julie and James are happy to start afresh. But this house, which sits between a lake and a forest, has its own plans for the unsuspecting couple. As Julie and James try to establish a sense of normalcy, the home and its surrounding terrain become the locus of increasingly strange happenings. The framework― claustrophobic, riddled with hidden rooms within rooms―becomes unrecognizable, decaying before their eyes. Stains are animated on the wall―contracting, expanding―and map themselves onto Julie’s body in the form of painful, grisly bruises. Like the house that torments the troubled married couple living within its walls, The Grip of It oozes with palpable terror and skin-prickling dread. Its architect, Jac Jemc, meticulously traces Julie and James’s unsettling journey through the depths of their new home as they fight to free themselves from its crushing grip.

Opening Lines:  Maybe we move in and we don’t hear the intonation for a few days. Maybe we hear it as soon as we unlock the door. Maybe we drag our friends and family into the house and ask them to hear it and they look into the distance and listen as we try to describe it and fail. “You don’t hear it? It’s like a mouth harp. Deep twang. Like throat singing. Ancient. Glottal. Resonant. Husky and rasping, but underwater.” Alone in the house, though, we become less aware of it, like a persistent, dull headache. Deaf to the sound, until the still silence of ownership settles over us. Maybe we decide we will try to like the noise. Maybe we find comfort in it. Maybe an idea insists itself more easily than an action.

Blurbworthiness:  â€œI mean this in the best possible way: Jac Jemc gives me the creeps. The Grip of It deserves a spot on the shelf beside Shirley Jackson’s The Haunting of Hill House, Henry James’ The Turn of the Screw, and Mark Danielewski’s House of Leaves―not only because it is a masterful haunted house story, but because it, like its literary predecessors, is elegantly written, psychologically rich, and damn terrifying.” (Benjamin Percy, author of The Dark Net)



The Shape of Ideas
by Grant Snider
(Abrams Comicarts)

I have a very short shelf of inspirational books about writing and creativity; right now, the only other residents are Still Writing by Dani Shapiro and On Writing by Stephen King. To that shelf, I am joyfully adding a new member: The Shape of Ideas by Grant Snider, creator of the equally-fabulous Incidental Comics. I am only about one-third of the way through this “Illustrated Exploration of Creativity,” but I am taking it slow because smart, beautiful books like this deserve to be savored. The Shape of Ideas is divided into chapters with headings like Inspiration, Perspiration, Aspiration, Contemplation, Pure Elation and other wonderful “-ation” words. Snider is inventive, witty, forthright, and, yes, inspirational. I am hereby declaring this is the Gift Book of the Year for all creators in your life. It is for everyone who, according to Snider in his Dear Reader note, has ever been mocked “for carrying a notebook to bars, restaurants, and children’s birthday parties,” and those who “have been glared at in class or during an important meeting for aimlessly doodling on scrap paper.” Snider is quick to point out The Shape of Ideas won’t help you tap into a bottomless well of creativity (a non-existent well, he says), but it will provide the kind of long-lasting, deep-drilled inspiration that will keep you going when you think all wells have run dry. Want one more scrap of encouragement before you dip your pen in the ink? In addition to being a world-class illustrator, Snider has a full-time day job as an orthodontist. Dentist by day, artist by night. That kind of dedication, perspiration, and aspiration makes me smile.

Jacket Copy:  What does an idea look like? And where do they come from? Grant Snider’s illustrations will motivate you to explore these questions, inspire you to come up with your own answers and, like all Gordian knots, prompt even more questions. Whether you are a professional artist or designer, a student pursuing a creative career, a person of faith, someone who likes walks on the beach, or a dreamer who sits on the front porch contemplating life, this collection of one- and two-page comics will provide insight into the joys and frustrations of creativity, inspiration, and process—no matter your age or creative background.

Opening Lines:

Blurbworthiness:  â€œGrant Snider’s work delivers introspection, humor, and inspiration in visually stunning drawings. They are a colorful look into the creative process—from the moments of quiet contemplation to the days of frenzied desperation.”  (Susan Cain author of Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking)



The Standard Grand
by Jay Baron Nicorvo
(St. Martin’s Press)

Some of the best war literature doesn’t involve bullets, blood, or bombs, but centers around what happens to warriors after they redeploy. Think The Yellow Birds by Kevin Powers, Be Safe I Love You by Cara Hoffman, Redeployment by Phil Klay, and Tim O’Brien’s short story “Speaking of Courage” from The Things They Carried. When you’re in the midst of the fog of war, it’s hard to think; the contemplation—and the nightmares—often don’t hit full force until after you’re back among the uncomfortable comforts of home. That’s one reason I’m looking forward to reading Jay Baron Nicorvo’s The Standard Grand; the other is the dazzling and inventive plot which involves an AWOL vet, a cougar, a resort in the Catskills and Senator Al Franken. Good things wait for us in these pages, dear reader.

Jacket Copy:  When an Army trucker goes AWOL before her third deployment, she ends up sleeping in Central Park. There, she meets a Vietnam vet and widower who inherited a tumbledown Borscht Belt resort. Converted into a halfway house for homeless veterans, the Standard―and its two thousand acres over the Marcellus Shale Formation―is coveted by a Houston-based multinational company. Toward what end, only a corporate executive knows. With three violent acts at its center―a mauling, a shooting, a mysterious death decades in the past―and set largely in the Catskills, The Standard Grand spans an epic year in the lives of its diverse cast: a female veteran protagonist, a Mesoamerican lesbian landman, a mercenary security contractor keeping secrets and seeking answers, a conspiratorial gang of combat vets fighting to get peaceably by, and a cougar―along with appearances by Sammy Davis, Jr. and Senator Al Franken. All of the characters―soldiers, civilians―struggle to discover that what matters most is not that they’ve caused no harm, but how they make amends for the harm they’ve caused. Jay Baron Nicorvo’s The Standard Grand confronts a glaring cultural omission: the absence of women in our war stories. Like the best of its characters―who aspire more to goodness than greatness―this American novel hopes to darn a hole or two in the frayed national fabric.

Opening Lines:  Specialist Smith gunned the gas and popped the clutch in the early Ozark morning. Her Dodge pickup yelped, slid to one side in the blue dark, then shot fishtailing forward. The rear tires burned a loud ten meters of smoking, skunky rubber out front of the stucco ranch house on Tidal Road.
       She felt thankful for her bad marriage. It allowed her the privilege of living off base; she could go AWOL without having to bust the gates of Fort Leonard Wood. Her four-barrel pocket pepperbox, a COP .357—holstered, unloaded—rode on the passenger seat.

Blurbworthiness:  â€œWith profound compassion for his outrageously wonderful characters, Nicorvo brings readers to a defunct and decaying Catskills resort where a ghost platoon of vets are surviving among dangers both natural and human-made. Insanely funny, by turns tragic and, ultimately, redemptive, The Standard Grand is a desperate masterpiece of a debut: honest, epic, constantly surprising, and relentlessly entertaining.”  (Bonnie Jo Campbell, author of American Salvage)



Crossings
by Jon Kerstetter
(Crown)

Another promising book about war landed on my doorstep this month and has promptly hooked me inside its pages. Like The Standard Grand, the memoir Crossings reminds us that battles are not fought by faceless robots bent on clinical killing but by men and women with bodies that can bleed and souls that can break. Army physician Jon Kerstetter volunteered for duty in Rwanda, Kosovo, and Bosnia and served three combat tours in Iraq. And then he came home and suffered a stroke. See, no robots here. The military may pride itself on its weaponized machinery, but its heart is still made of flesh and blood.

Jacket Copy:  Every juncture in Jon Kerstetter’s life has been marked by a crossing from one world into another: from civilian to doctor to soldier; between healing and waging war; and between compassion and hatred of the enemy. When an injury led to a stroke that ended his careers as a doctor and a soldier, he faced the most difficult crossing of all, a recovery that proved as shattering as war itself. Crossings is a memoir of an improbable, powerfully drawn life, one that began in poverty on the Oneida Reservation in Wisconsin but grew by force of will to encompass a remarkable medical practice. Trained as an emergency physician, Kerstetter’s thirst for intensity led him to volunteer in war-torn Rwanda, Kosovo, and Bosnia, and to join the Army National Guard. His three tours in the Iraq War marked the height of the American struggle there. The story of his work in theater, which involved everything from saving soldiers’ lives to organizing the joint U.S.–Iraqi forensics team tasked with identifying the bodies of Saddam Hussein’s sons, is a bracing, unprecedented evocation of a doctor’s life at war. But war was only the start of Kerstetter’s struggle. The stroke he suffered upon returning from Iraq led to serious cognitive and physical disabilities. His years-long recovery, impeded by near-unbearable pain and complicated by PTSD, meant overcoming the perceived limits of his body and mind and re-imagining his own capacity for renewal and change. It led him not only to writing as a vocation but to a deeper understanding of how healing means accepting a new identity, and how that acceptance must be fought for with as much tenacity as any battlefield victory.

Opening Lines:  A soldier lies in the sand, blood pooling beneath his head, mouth gulping at the air. His eyes fixed, head tilted off to one side, legs and arms motionless. He’s a young soldier in his early twenties, late teens, a young man who should be a freshman in college or finding a summer job while deciding what to do after high school. In less than five minutes he’ll probably die right there in the dirt, right at your feet. You will carry his bloodstains on your boots and on the sleeves of your uniform.

Blurbworthiness:  â€œThe author’s emergence as a military doctor makes for interesting reading...but what is of greatest value in this narrative is Kerstetter’s ongoing, twofold recovery from a stroke on one hand and PTSD on the other...The author’s medical perspective on his own condition and critical therapeutic moments adds depth to an already solid story. An inspiring memoir.”  (Kirkus Reviews)


Fresh Complaint
by Jeffrey Eugenides
(Farrar, Straus and Giroux)

Jeffrey Eugenides’ short story collection—his first in a writing career which began in 1993 with The Virgin Suicides—is a virtually gallery of great opening lines. I won’t list them all here—apart from the book’s very first lines (see below)—but as one example, here’s the bold, funny start to “Baster,” which originally appeared in The New Yorker:
The recipe came in the mail:

Mix semen of three men.
Stir vigorously.
Fill turkey baster.
Recline.
Insert nozzle.
Squeeze.

Ingredients:
1 pinch Stu Wadsworth
1 pinch Jim Freeson
1 pinch Wally Mars

There was no return address but Tomasina knew who had sent it: Diane, her best friend and, recently, fertility specialist.
Now, that’s funny stuff. The rest of the collection promises even more smart hilarity. No complaints here.

Jacket Copy:  Jeffrey Eugenides’s bestselling novels have shown him to be an astute observer of the crises of adolescence, self-discovery, family love, and what it means to be American in our times. The stories in Fresh Complaint explore equally rich­­––­­and intriguing­­––territory. Ranging from the bitingly reproductive antics of “Baster” to the dreamy, moving account of a young traveler’s search for enlightenment in “Air Mail” (selected by Annie Proulx for Best American Short Stories), this collection presents characters in the midst of personal and national emergencies. We meet a failed poet who, envious of other people’s wealth during the real-estate bubble, becomes an embezzler; a clavichordist whose dreams of art founder under the obligations of marriage and fatherhood; and, in “Fresh Complaint,” a high school student whose wish to escape the strictures of her immigrant family lead her to a drastic decision that upends the life of a middle-aged British physicist. Narratively compelling, beautifully written, and packed with a density of ideas despite their fluid grace, these stories chart the development and maturation of a major American writer.

Opening Lines:  Coming up the drive in the rental car, Cathy sees the sign and has to laugh. “Wyndham Falls. Gracious Retirement Living.”
       Not exactly how Della has described it.
       The building comes into view next. The main entrance looks nice enough. It’s big and glassy, with white benches outside and an air of medical orderliness. But the garden apartments set back on the property are small and shabby. Tiny porches, like animal pens. The sense, outside the curtained windows and weather-beaten doors, of lonely lives within.


Front Porch Books is a monthly tally of books—mainly advance review copies (aka “uncorrected proofs” and “galleys”)—I’ve received from publishers. Because my dear friends, Mr. FedEx and Mrs. UPS, leave them with a doorbell-and-dash method of delivery, I call them my Front Porch Books. In this digital age, ARCs are also beamed to the doorstep of my Kindle via NetGalley and Edelweiss. Note: many of these books won’t be released for another 2-6 months; I’m here to pique your interest and stock your wish lists. Cover art and opening lines may change before the book is finally released. I should also mention that, in nearly every case, I haven’t had a chance to read these books.



          DARK WEB and SILK ROAD        

Dark Web and Silk Road are terms that are often misunderstood. The Dark  Web refers to that segment of the internet that is not visible to search engines, and the name Silk Road refers to a dark net market created by now imprisoned Ross William Ulbricht.   Included among the crimes Ulbricht was convicted of were … Continue reading DARK WEB and SILK ROAD →

The post DARK WEB and SILK ROAD appeared first on Mysterious Topics .


          Links to talks and demos from 9/2/2016        
Here are the links to my talk about a Cinci2600 darknet and an explanation and video of Cameron’s demo of the Man In The Middle attack. VPNs and Dark Networks by Chris Maerz In The Mix (MITM) by Cameron I have copies of several older Cinci2600 presentations, but Word Press is racist against the Open […]
          The Dark Net        
The Dark Net
author: Jamie Bartlett
name: Catherine
average rating: 3.87
book published: 2014
rating: 0
read at: 2017/07/04
date added: 2017/07/04
shelves:
review:


          Is the dark net evil ? many spooky things lurk there        

You thought the regular net was bad enough. or the deep web was scary enough. But have you ever heard of the dark net? Some people say it is to be secretive and hide what you say or have freedom of speech. Yet others say it's a place where evil and very bad things lurk.

Here is a scary tale about the Dark net! Would you ever dare go there?



          Comment on U.S. and Europe take down AlphaBay and Hansa dark net markets by Jogo Dollar        
Darknets**
          Comment on U.S. and Europe take down AlphaBay and Hansa dark net markets by Jogo Dollar        
Cutting off the head of a hydra seems like a win in the short run but utterly useless in the long run. Meanwhile Silk Road 3.0 is still running smoothly. Soon better and more secure darkness will surface.
          The Dark Net by Benjamin Percy        
The Dark Net by Benjamin Percy

The Dark Net is a standalone novel by Benjamin Percy, an author that until now was new to me; thus I didn’t know what to expect when I picked up the book. And nothing prepared me for what I was about to read. Even after reading the blurb and a few Goodreads reviews, I had an entirely different notion of what the book would be compared to what it ended up being. After the first few chapters, I thought the book would be a novel about … the Dark Net and the illegal tradings going on there (and yes, which […]

The post The Dark Net by Benjamin Percy appeared first on Mystery Sequels.


          Dark Net        
A documentary series that explores the furthest reaches of the internet and the people who frequent it, Dark Net provides a revealing and cautionary look inside a vast cyber netherworld rarely witnessed by most of us. Provocative, thought-provoking and frequently profound, each episode illuminates an exciting, ever-expanding frontier where people can do anything and see […]
          ÐšÐ¾Ð»Ð¸Ñ‡ÐµÑÑ‚во Tor-сайтов и прошлогодний отчет The Tor Dark Net        
С мест сообщают, что Tor-сайтов значительно меньше, чем предполагалось ранее.
          There really is no "Dark Net"        
So says one of the creators of the TOR network:
Roger Dingledine, one of the three founders of the Tor Project, castigated journos for mischaracterizing the pro-privacy system as a bolthole exclusively used by drug dealers and pedophiles to hide from the authorities. 
In fact, he said, only three per cent of Tor users connect to hidden services, suggesting the vast majority of folks on the network are using it to anonymously browse public websites for completely legit purposes. In other words, netizens – from journalists to activists to normal peeps – use Tor to mask their identities from website owners, and it's not just underworld villains. 
Dingledine even went as far as saying the dark web – a landscape of websites concealed within networks like Tor – is so insignificant, it can be discounted. 
“There is basically no dark web. It doesn’t exist,” he told his DEF CON audience. “It’s only a very few webpages.”
Interesting article.  I hadn't known that Facebook supports TOR.

If you care about Internet privacy, should should RTWT.
          Dylann Roof: How to make a rampage murderer         
As the penalty-phase trial of young white supremacist Dylann Roof gets underway this week, reporters have asked me to explain the psychological dynamics that trigger deadly rampages like Roof’s at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina. My answer: Although the specifics such as locale and target shift, the broad contours of such spree killings remain remarkably constant. Here is my recipe of key ingredients:

1. Alienation


We humans are tribal animals. For millennia, we lived in tightly knit, cooperative societies where individuals were rarely alone. As author Sebastian Junger explores in Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging, tribal identity motivates individuals to sacrifice for the collective good. In stark contrast, modern society deprives people of that essential sense of connection or belonging. Our current technological atomization is “deeply brutalizing to the human spirit,” writes Junger. Cast adrift, people feel meaningless and superfluous. Social alienation is producing epidemic rates of depression and suicide. But it is in spree killings that we see the ultimate expression of malignant alienation: Embracing nihilism, the killer finds meaning via symbolically destroying not just himself, but also the social order that rebuffed and humiliated him.

Mark Ames, author of the meticulously researched Going Postal, goes so far as to argue that mass shootings are a form of doomed rebellion against a toxic culture: Otherwise normal people snap when pushed to the breaking point within decollectivized, militarized and ruthless settings. Workplace sprees occur in oppressive institutional settings rife with surveillance, mandatory unpaid overtime, and humiliating and degrading layoff rituals. Sites of school shootings, meanwhile, are often brutal places where students undergo chronic torment. The more endemic alienation becomes, the more people will snap.

2. Failure


This is perhaps obvious, but setting the stage for a spree killing is cataclysmic failure. Except in warfare, satisfied people don’t suddenly morph into killing machines. The killer has failed a life-stage transition, and his life has gone off track. Dylann Roof had a troubled childhood, marked by abuse, neglect, severe anxiety and academic failure, according to published accounts. He dropped out of high school. As a young adult, he couldn’t get a job or even a driver’s license. He coped by drinking heavily. The lives of other recent mass killers were similarly catastrophic, marked by failures on academic, vocational and/or relationship fronts. Adam Lanza (Sandy Hook) and Elliot Rodger (Isla Vista) had autism-spectrum conditions that left them incapable of forming intimate relationships. Omar Mateen (The Pulse nightclub) was a socially awkward loser: he flunked out of police training, got fired as a prison guard, and ended up doing lowly security work; his wife fled after he beat her.

3. Entitlement


Dylann Roof posing in his bedroom.
Failure alone is insufficient. The failure must be perceived as unfair. Like Roof, whose grandfather was a prominent attorney, the killer often has middle-class roots, inculcating the American mythology of success. Mass shooters often have higher aspirations than are realistic for their station in life. In Hunting Humans, pioneering anthropologist Elliott Leyton argues that the modern mass murderer tends to be especially socially conservative, class-conscious, and obsessed with power and status. Yet in our increasingly fragmented, alienating and high-stress world, a high-quality life is difficult for many a young American to achieve. Recognizing that he is on a dead-end trajectory and that his class aspirations will not be realized produces profound disappointment, personal shame and – ultimately - despair. To reduce cognitive dissonance, he needs someone to blame.

4. Projection


By the time he explodes, the spree killer has amassed an enormous reservoir of bitterness. He feels unfairly victimized. Through a scarcity lens, he perceives less deserving people as stealing away his opportunities and robbing him of his right to happiness. Those perceived as undeserving typically include lower-status or socially stigmatized groups such as people of color, women, sexual minorities or immigrants. This is the politics of resentment that Trump milked so effectively.

Also feeding into the potent fury of many mass murderers are childhood histories of being bullied and socially rejected. In Rampage: The Social Roots of School Shootings, Katherine Newman and colleagues chronicle the tormented lives of infamous school shooters. Many were incessantly harassed, with antigay epithets a common refrain. In high school, Seung-Hui Cho (Virginia Tech) was relentlessly bullied over his social awkwardness, speech impediment and immigrant background. Dylann Roof was described as a “bug-eyed boy” with a bowl haircut who struggled academically; we can only guess at his social travails.

5. Masculinity


Spree killings are exceedingly rare (making them impossible to predict). Not every alienated, bitter loner picks up an assault rifle. But those who do are invariably male. Women are more likely to blame themselves for their misery. As journalist Jamie Bartlett reveals in The Dark Net, hundreds of thousands of young women ages 13-25 flock to the myriad “pro-cutting” and “pro-ana” (anorexia) Internet sites that have sprung up in response to demand from alienated young women.

In contrast to this turning inward, many young men regard violence against others as a way to gain status and respect. Our cultural glorification of male violence is evidenced by the enormous popularity of first-person shooter and warfare games. It is evidenced by the lack of meaningful protest over our government’s modeling of murder as a solution to problems: U.S. military drone strikes in the Middle East have slaughtered many hundreds of civilians, with little fanfare. After all, we are the good guys, protecting the world against evil. As boys grow up, writes masculinity scholar Michael Kimmel, “they learn that they are entitled to feel like a real man, and that they have the right to annihilate anyone who challenges that sense of entitlement.”

Mass shootings are a quintessentially American theatrical production, the ultimate display of alienated hypermasculinity inside the world's leading imperial power. The production is carefully planned and staged, often accompanied by websites, online manifestos and photos that will help it propagate and endure in the cultural imagination. Embittered young men seize upon the restorative potential of violence, which enables them to extract vengeance for a litany of wrongs both real and imagined. Even more powerfully, violence offers the lure of immortality: Rack up enough dead bodies, and you become infamous. You are no longer a nobody; you are a warrior.

6. Ideology


To become a warrior, one needs a cause. There is no shortage of alienated young men like Roof, reared on a diet of masculine entitlement and believing that they have been treated unfairly. In another time, they might be like dying trees in a parched forest, standing alone and unnoticed until their eventual collapse. But in the age of the enchanted Internet, such men can simultaneously retreat from humanity yet plug into like-minded online communities where their diffuse rage can find a focus.

Elliot Rodger (Isla Vista) in pre-production selfie: "I am gorgeous"
Take Elliot Rodger, the Isla Vista killer. A flop with women despite his self-described “gorgeous” looks, he immersed himself in the misogynist realm of the “manosphere,” where “men’s rights” proponents and “pickup artists” rail against power-mad feminists who are denying men their natural-born right to supremacy (and sex). Such insular communities are like echo chambers, validating and amplifying warped ideologies. Within the manosphere, Rodger transformed himself from an invisible nobody -- a "beta male," in man-speak -- into a “true alpha male,” in his words, a heroic warrior standing up for oppressed “incels,” or involuntary celibates.

“Women are like a plague,” he repeats several times in an online manifesto. “The mere sight of them enjoying their happy lives was an insult to me, because I deserve it more than them…. They don’t deserve to have any rights. Their wickedness must be contained in order to prevent future generations from falling to degeneracy. Women are vicious, evil, barbaric animals, and they need to be treated as such.”

Like Rodger, Dylann Roof retreated into the Web. But instead of the manosphere, his search for meaning led him to the white supremacist channel. Specifically, the Council of Conservative Citizens, aka the “uptown Klan,” which devotes a lot of energy to disseminating propaganda about the menace of black-on-white crime. The atomization of culture into discreet identities has left many white men feeling abandoned and scapegoated, and racist ideology is quick to fill this vacuum. Roof eagerly soaked up the ideology of a white race under siege; like Rodger, he also grew frustrated with the preponderance of rhetoric over action. “[S]omeone has to have the bravery to take it to the real world, and I guess that has to be me,” he wrote. “I have no choice.”

Reducing the world to a stark black and white furthers the killer's self-image as a heroic warrior battling the forces of evil. In Terrorist’s Creed: Fanatical Violence and the Human Need for Meaning, fascism scholar Roger Griffin calls this “heroic doubling”: fanatics deploy violence as a call to arms to defend an idealized in-group against perceived threat by a demonized Other. Ideologically motivated killers like Roof, Rodger or the Norwegian mass murderer Anders Breivik may act alone in the moment, but they see themselves as soldiers in a larger movement. The growing popularity of online manifestos – Roof had one, too, although at four pages it paled in comparison to Rodger’s 141-page tome – attests to the narcissistic fervor with which spree killers cling to their adopted ideologies as rationale for bloodshed.

What makes the ascendancy of extremist rhetoric so dangerous is this capacity to activate the alienated loner. A direct cause-and-effect relationship is readily observable: Donald Trump spews anti-Muslim vitriol, and in short order attacks on U.S. Muslims spike. Public figures can produce random lone-wolf violence via repeatedly demonizing an out-group, while maintaining plausible disavowal of responsibility. This practice -- most well-known for its contribution to abortion clinic bombings -- has a scholarly term, "stochastic terrorism.” In Roof's case, the Council of Conservative Citizens whose message Roof parroted in his manifesto was quick to issue a statement deploring the massacre, even while defending Roof's racist belief system as correct.

7. Contagion


In late-18th century Germany, groups of young men could be seen strolling about in identical outfits of blue tailcoats, yellow trousers and high boots. They were imitating Werther, the romantic hero of the sensational novel The Sorrows of Young Werther, in which the idealistic protagonist kills himself over unrequited love. Blamed for a rash of copycat suicides among the impressionable and mentally ill, the novel was banned in Italy and Denmark.

This so-called Werther Fever is an early example of what we now refer to as a cultural meme – an idea, fashion or behavior transmitted like a virus from person to person, often via mass media, that takes on a life of its own as it propagates.

Seung-Hui Cho (Virginia Tech) poses in pre-production selfie
Spree killings seem to have morphed into just such a cultural meme. Especially with the spread of social media, they often go viral, tempting the next angry and alienated man with the tantalizing promise of infamy and immortality – especially if the body count is high enough.

In truth, however, this immortality is illusory, as the very ubiquity of the mass shooter meme is numbing the public; one killer’s fame lasts only for the brief interval until another pushes him aside. Dylann Roof will have his moment in the spotlight this week, and then it will be on to the next case.

Instead of just dissecting each individual act in this never-ending drama (and emphasizing singular elements such as untreated mental illness, gun accessibility, social media, violent video games, bad parenting, law enforcement failures of prediction, and the like), we might do well to regard young men like Roof as canaries in the coal mine. It is only when the air in the mine is poisonous that the canary will die.

In the award-winning TV show Mr. Robot, there are these ninja assassins who, when cornered, put a bullet in their own brain. A computer-crimes detective refers to this as “erasing their histories.” In orchestrating a dramatic last stand, mass shooters like Roof are doing precisely this, erasing their heretofore empty and meaningless lives and replacing them with a meme.

Related blog posts:

Dylann Roof's full manifesto is HERE; Elliot Rodger's is HERE.
          [TerrorExpectativa] Livros de Terror que Serão Lançados no Segundo Semestre de 2017        
   E a última parte da série de posts sobre lançamentos é o TerrorExpectativa com foco nos principais lançamentos brasileiros e estrangeiros de livros de terror. Aqui no Brasil é difícil fazer uma lista do gênero principalmente porque poucas editoras anunciam com antecedência o que vão publicar, em muitos casos só ficamos sabendo que determinada obra será lançada quando já a encontramos para venda. Entre os destaques desta lista, estão os lançamentos da Darskide Books, Um Lugar Sombrio, o novo livro do casal Warren e Candyman de Clive Barker, lançamento solo do conto presente nos Livros de Sangue V; ambos sem data de lançamento definida. Pela Intrínseca temos a novela de Josh Malerman, A House at the Bottom of a Lake e Mind Hunter de John Douglas. Pela Suma de Letras a nova edição de A Hora do Lobisomem e Sleeping Beauties de Stephen King. E por último o lançamento nacional: Narrativas do Medo, antologia que reúne os principais escritores brasileiros de terror da atualidade. 

Brasil

Um lugar sombrio de Ed & Lorraine Warren e Ray Garton
A história do caso mais terrível de possessão demoníaca nos Estados Unidos e que serviu de inspiração para o filme de sucesso The Haunting in Connecticut, estrelado por Virginia Madsen. Pouco depois de se mudar para seu novo lar, a família Snedeker é atacada por uma presença sinistra que começa a perseguir toda a família. Quando todos os recursos se esgotam eles chamam os demonologistas de renome mundial Ed e Lorraine Warren que nunca encontraram um caso tão assustador quanto este ... Ninguém havia avisado os Snedekers que sua nova casa costumava ser uma antiga casa funerária. Sua batalha contra um fenômeno inexplicável e selvagem está apenas no início. O que começou como um poltergeist simples culminou em uma guerra de grandes proporções, uma família americana média lutando contra as forças mais sombrias e escuras do mal, uma guerra que não poderia ser perdida.

Candyman de Clive Barker
   A Darkside Books anunciou em seu facebook que lançará uma edição especial do conto O Proibido de Clive Barker, história que deu origem ao filme O Mistério de Candyman, publicado originalmente no quinto volume da famosa coleção Livros de Sangue. Na história uma pesquisadora descobre, em um decadente conjunto habitacional, que lendas urbanas podem ser reais, vários assassinatos não-resolvidos são atribuídos pelos moradores locais a uma mítica criatura conhecida como Candyman. Com um gancho no lugar de uma das mãos ele estripa suas vítimas com uma crueldade digna de um cenobita.

A Hora do Lobisomem de Stephen King 
   "O primeiro grito veio de um trabalhador da ferrovia isolado pela neve, enquanto as presas do monstro dilaceravam sua garganta. No mês seguinte, um grito de êxtase e agonia vem de uma mulher atacada no próprio quarto. Agora, a cada vez que a lua cheia brilha sobre a cidade de Tarker’s Mill, surgem novas cenas de terror inimaginável. Quem será o próximo? Quando a lua cresce no céu, um terror paralisante toma os moradores da cidade. Uivos quase humanos ecoam no vento. E por todo lado as pegadas de um monstro cuja fome nunca é saciada. Um clássico de Stephen King, com as ilustrações originais de Bernie Wrightson"

Mind Hunter de John Douglas e  Mark Olshaker 
   Durante sua carreira de vinte e cinco anos o Agente Especial John Douglas tornou-se uma figura lendária na aplicação da lei, perseguindo alguns dos assassinos em série mais notórios e sádicos do nosso tempo: o homem que caçava prostitutas de esporte nas florestas do Alaska, o infanticida de Atlanta e o assassino de Green River de Seattle, o caso que quase custou a Douglas sua vida. Douglas enfrentou, entrevistou e estudou dezenas de assassinos em série, incluindo Charles Manson, Ted Bundy e Ed Gein. Usando sua habilidade estranha para se tornar predador e presa, Douglas examina cada cena do crime, revivendo as ações do assassino e da vítima em sua mente, criando seus perfis, descrevendo seus hábitos e prevendo seus próximos movimentos.

Sleeping Beauties de Stephen King e Owen King
   Em um futuro real e próximo, algo acontece quando as mulheres adormecem; elas ficam envoltas em um tipo de casulo. Se são despertadas, se a gaze envolvendo seus corpos é perturbada ou violada, as mulheres tornam-se selvagens e espetacularmente violentas; e enquanto elas dormem, vão para outro lugar… Os homens de nosso mundo são abandonados em seus dispositivos cada vez mais primitivos. Uma mulher, no entanto, é imune à bênção ou maldição da doença do sono. Evie é uma anomalia médica a ser estudada? Ou ela é um demônio que deve ser morto?”

A Torre Do Terror de Jennifer Mcmahon
   Nos anos 1950, o Hotel da Torre, com seus 28 quartos, era a maior atração da pequena Londres, em Vermont. Hoje está abandonado, vivo apenas na memória de três mulheres — as irmãs Piper e Margot e sua amiga, Amy Slater, filha da família que o administrava. Elas costumavam brincar lá quando pequenas, até o dia em que as brincadeiras desenterraram algo macabro e sinistro do passado dos Slater — algo que determinou o fim da amizade de Piper e Margot com Amy.Com o passar dos anos, as irmãs fizeram tudo o que puderam para deixar o episódio para trás, até que um dia recebem a notícia: Amy e sua família estão mortos, supostamente pelas mãos da própria Amy. Só que, antes de morrer, Amy deixou escrita uma mensagem que as irmãs sabem ser direcionada a elas: “29 quartos”. De repente, Margot e Piper são forçadas a revisitar aquele verão fatídico.


Narrativas do Medo de Vitor Abdala e Paul Richard Ugo
   Narrativas do Medo reúne os seguintes autores: Ademir Pascale (autor de O Desejo de Lilith e Caçadores de Demônios), Alexandre Callari (da trilogia Apocalipse Zumbi), Alfer Medeiros (da saga Fúria Lupina),  Cesar Bravo (de Ultra Carnem), Daniel Pires (do Canal Lenda Urbana), Duda Falcão (de Mausoléu e Treze), as revelações Flávio Karras e  Hedjan C.S, Geraldo de Fraga (de Histórias que nos Sangram), Márcio Benjamin (de Maldito Sertão e Fome), Marcos DeBrito (de O Escravo de Capela e do filme Condado Macabro), Marcus Barcelos (de Horror na Colina de Darrington), Melvin Menoviks (de A Caixa de Natasha), Paul Richard Ugo (de Contos de Alguns Lugares), Petter Baiestorf (lenda do cinema de horror independente), Rô Mierling (de Diário de uma Escrava), Rodrigo Ramos (do portal Boca do Inferno e coautor de Medo de Palhaço) e o próprio Vitor Abdala (de Tânatos e Macabra Mente).

As Sobreviventes de Riley Sager 
   Há dez anos, a estudante universitária Quincy Carpenter viajou com seus melhores amigos e retornou sozinha, foi a única sobrevivente de um crime terrível. Num piscar de olhos, ela se viu pertencendo a um grupo do qual ninguém quer fazer parte: um grupo de garotas sobreviventes com histórias similares. Lisa, que perdeu nove amigas esfaqueadas na universidade; Sam, que enfrentou um assassino no hotel onde trabalhava; e agora Quincy, que correu sangrando pelos bosques para escapar do homem a quem ela se refere apenas como Ele. As três jovens se esforçam para afastar seus pesadelos, e, com isso, permanecem longe uma da outra; apesar das tentativas da mídia, elas nunca se encontraram. 
   Um bloqueio na memória de Quincy não permite que ela se lembre dos acontecimentos daquela noite, e por causa disso a jovem seguiu em frente: é uma blogueira culinária de sucesso, tem um namorado amoroso e mantém uma forte amizade com Coop, o policial que salvou sua vida naquela noite. Até que um dia, Lisa, a primeira sobrevivente, é encontrada morta na banheira de sua casa com os pulsos cortados; e Sam, a outra garota, surge na porta de Quincy determinada a fazê-la reviver o passado, o que provocará consequências cada vez mais assustadoras. O que Sam realmente procura na história de vida de Quincy? 
   Quando novos detalhes sobre a morte de Lisa vem à tona, Quincy percebe que precisa se lembrar do que aconteceu naquela noite traumática se quiser as respostas para as verdades e mentiras de Sam, esquivar-se da polícia e dos repórteres insaciáveis. Mas recuperar a memória pode revelar muito mais do que ela gostaria.

Apocalipse Zumbi 3 de Alexandre Callari
   Terceiro volume retoma a jornada de Manes, Bispo, Tebas, Junior, Maria, José, Mariana, Zenóbia e outros personagens que habitavam o Quartel Ctesifonte, a casa de Duda e a Catedral nesta obra que finaliza a história desses sobreviventes da era D.A. As descrições detalhadas dos ambientes e dos pensamentos e flashbacks presentes nos volumes anteriores continuam e enriquecem a leitura. Esse volume é o desfecho da saga Abrigos serão invadidos, batalhas vão acontecer e reencontros existirão, afinal o que será da humanidade depois do apocalipse?


A House at the Bottom of a Lake de Josh Malerman
Parecia o primeiro encontro perfeito: canoagem através de uma cadeia de lagos, sanduíches e cerveja gelada. Mas os adolescentes Amelia e James descobrem algo abaixo da superfície da água que muda suas vidas para sempre.


Lançamentos Estrangeiros

I Am Behind You de John Ajvide Lindqvist
Quatro famílias acordam uma manhã nos seus trailers, ao lado de seus carros, em um acampamento comum no sul da Suécia. No entanto, durante a noite aconteceu algo estranho. Todo o resto desapareceu e o mundo se transformou em uma extensão infinita de grama. O céu é azul, mas não há sinal do sol; Não há árvores, nem flores, nem pássaros. E cada rádio não toca nada além das músicas do ícone pop Peter Himmelstrand. À medida que os turistas tentam chegar a um acordo sobre o que aconteceu, eles são obrigados a enfrentar seus medos e desejos secretos e, em muitos casos, expor os aspectos menos atraentes de seu caráter. Os eventos passados que eles tentaram enterrar levantam-se à superfície e assumem uma forma física aterradora. Algum deles pode encontrar um caminho de volta à realidade?

The Dark Net de Benjamin Percy 
   A dark net é real. Um local anônimo onde o crime existe em segredo, ao alcance da web, alguns a utilizam para gerenciar Bitcoins, filmes e músicas piratas, ou tráfico de drogas e produtos roubados.  E agora, uma antiga escuridão está navegando por seus domínios. Esses demônios estão ameaçando se espalhar viralmente para o mundo real, a menos que possam ser impedidos por membros de um estranho grupo: Hannah, uma menina de doze anos, que foi equipada com o Mirage, uma prótese visual de alta tecnologia para combater a cegueira, e pergunta por que vê sombras em torno de algumas pessoas. Uma jornalista tecnofóbica chamada Lela, que tropeçou em uma história que ninguém quer que ela descubra. Mike Juniper - um evangelista infantil que sofre de demônios pessoais e literais - e tem um arsenal de armas armazenadas no porão do abrigo para sem-tetos que comanda. E Derek, um hacker com uma causa, um soldado da Internet, parte de um exército cibernético semelhante a Anonymous.

When I Cast Your Shadow de Sarah Porter 
Dashiell Bohnacker fazia da vida de sua família um inferno enquanto estava vivo. Mas isso é ainda pior agora que está morto... Depois que seu irmão mais velho, Dashiell, morre de uma overdose, Ruby, de dezesseis anos, é tomada pelo sofrimento e saudade. Ela não sabe que o fantasma de Dashiell está usando seus sonhos noturnos como uma maneira de possuir seu corpo - e persuadir seu irmão gêmeo, Everett, a se submeter à possessão também. Dashiell diz a Ruby e Everett que ele retornou da Terra dos Mortos para amarrar as pontas soltas que deixou para trás, mas ele está fugindo das forças mais cruéis e poderosas do que qualquer coisa que os gêmeos de Bohnacker jamais imaginaram... 

The Twilight Pariah de  Jeffrey Ford
   Maggie, Russell e Henry queriam sair de suas últimas férias na faculdade para se embebedar e brincar de arqueólogos em uma casa antiga na floresta fora da cidade. Quando escavam a dependência da mansão, eles encontram muito mais do que esperavam: uma garrafa selada preenchida com um líquido vermelho, juntamente com o estranho esqueleto de uma criança com chifres. Perturbar aquele esqueletos transforma a vida de cada um em um inferno. Eles se sentem seguidos onde quer que vão, suas casas são saqueadas por intrusos desconhecidos e as pessoas com que se importam são brutalmente desmembradas. Os três amigos despertaram algo, uma criatura que não vai parar até recuperar seu filho. 

The Murders of Molly Southbourne de Tade Thompson 
   A regra é simples: não sangre. Desde que pode se lembrar Molly Southbourne está fugindo da morte. Sempre que ela sangra, nasce uma outra Molly, idêntica a ela em todos os sentidos, mas que quer matá-la. Molly conhece todas as formas que pode morrer, mas também sabe que, enquanto sobreviver, será caçada. Não importa o quão bem ela siga as regras, eventualmente as Mollys a encontrarão. Será que Molly encontrará uma maneira de parar a maré de sangue ou encontrará seu final nas mãos de uma menina que se parece com ela?

Return to Woodbury de Jay Bonansinga
O último livro da série best-seller do New York Times!
   Contra todas as probabilidades, contra os desejos de seu povo, Lilly leva um grupo de verdadeiros crentes de volta à paisagem impossível de enxames walkers, rios inundados, grupos de assassinos psicóticos e perigos como os que ela nunca conheceu. Ao longo do caminho, ela descobre uma verdade perturbadora sobre si mesma. Ela está disposta a ir ao lugar mais escuro para sobreviver, a fim de salvar seu povo, para fazer a única coisa que sabe que tem que fazer: Retornar para Woodbury.

Strange Weather de Joe Hill 

O novo livro de Joe Hill conterá quatro novelas:
   "Snapshot" é a história perturbadora de um adolescente do Vale do Silício que se vê ameaçado pelo "The Phoenician", um bandido tatuado que possui uma câmera instantânea Polaroid que apaga memórias, clique por clique.
   Um jovem sobe aos céus para experimentar seu primeiro salto de pára-quedas. . . E acaba com um náufrago em uma nuvem impossivelmente sólida, uma ilha de vapor de ar que parece animada por uma mente própria em "Aloft".
   Em um dia aparentemente comum em Boulder, Colorado, as nuvens se abrem em um aguaceiro de unhas, aparas de cristal brilhante que destroem a pele de qualquer que não esteja adequadamente protegido. "Rain" explora este evento apocalíptico em grandes escalas, já que o dilúvio de unhas se espalha em todo o país e em todo o mundo.
   Em "Loaded", um segurança de shopping em uma cidade costeira da Flórida, corajosamente, para um tiroteio em massa e se torna um herói para o movimento moderno dos direitos de armas. Mas sob o brilho dos holofotes, sua história começa a revelar, levando sua sanidade com ele. Quando um incêndio de verão fora de controle se aproxima da cidade, ele pegará sua arma novamente e embarcará em um último dia de trabalho.


          Darknet Links - Deep Web Links 2016         
This is a list of working deep web links. To access the deep web you will need TOR. Either you can use the TOR Browser bundle or a more secure "version" of TOR to avoid being tracked online.

The list below is for educational/research purposes only.
dark net links, deep web links, silk road, tor browser


Consider leaving a comment. No CP. Thank you!
          AlphaBay: Global authorities shut down dark net market 10 times the size of 2013’s Silk Road        
AlphaBay was recently taken down. ABC news posted about it HERE. The US Justice Department has announced it has shut down the dark net marketplace AlphaBay, working with international partners to knock offline the site accused of allowing hundreds of thousands of people to buy and sell drugs, firearms, computer hacking tools and other illicit … Continue reading AlphaBay: Global authorities shut down dark net market 10 times the size of 2013’s Silk Road
          Surveillance, Privacy, and Security on the Internet        
A short conversation with--and reading by--Jamie Bartlett, author of The Dark Net.
          Exploring The Dark Net with Author Jamie Bartlett        
A discussion about the what happens in the part of the Internet that's anonymous but where market mechanisms, technology, ethics, and human behavior still mix.
          RELEASE TOUR FOR DIGITAL VELOCITY        




DIGITAL VELOCITY
The McAllister Justice Series Book 1
by Reily Garrett

Genre: Suspense/Thriller



The deadliest weapons are the ones we never see.

Keyboard prodigy, Lexi Donovan has risen from teenage orphan of the streets to complete independence with little help along the way. When a pervert threatens her friend, she sends an anonymous message to police, leading to a firefight that leaves a cop wounded.

Detective Ethan McAllister’s well-ordered life turned upside down the day an obscure text message led to a sexual predator’s identity and arrest. Since then, Callouston PD’s finest can’t trace the elusive hacker. The latest tip leads him to a brutal mutilation and a riddle indicating the identity of the next murder victim.

The dark net houses a playground for the morally depleted and criminally insane. When Lexi discovers the killer’s digital betting arena, she finds herself centered in a cyber stalker’s crosshairs, a psychopath bearing equal talent.

Street life strengthened Lexi while toughening her protective shell, but nothing could shield her from the shrewd detective forging a path to her heart.

“Digital Velocity is a fast-paced romantic suspense thriller that sophisticatedly weaves drama, excitement, grit, raw emotions and mystery. Garrett takes her readers on a journey where suspense and romance are taken up several notches as she unfolds and reveals the identity of a murderer that is on the loose. With her vivid prose, Garrett entices readers to see the bond that is brewing between Detective Ethan McAllister and his unlikely informant.” Michelle Tan, RT Book Reviews


I move frequently—but gain no distance.
I am warm, moist, and dark but give no comfort.
I can stretch and shrink, giving or taking at will, bringing both pain and pleasure with each.

“If God wanted you to tie the knot, he’d give you a near-death experience to better appreciate life, along with a craving for procreation. Then he’d smother your soul with the essence of venison, squirrel, frog legs, taters, and beer, to attract a likely counterpart from the sticks. No, wait. The latter has already happened, hasn’t it? Sorry.” Ethan narrowly kept his balance on the green-slicked, handmade bricks leading up the two-story, mauve-colored Victorian. If his 210-pound mass ended up sprawled on the steps, no doubt the picture would be splashed all over the precinct by noon with various unsavory captions.

“Maybe you should try it. The stick up your ass has to cause at least minor discomfort.” Larrick’s early-morning snark was a common greeting.

“Hey, I’m a normal guy.” Ethan glared over his shoulder.

Larrick snorted.

“Still wet from our early-morning storm. Watch your step, it’s slippery.” Scanning the myriad amorphous shadows lurking in the wood line, realization struck that he and his partner were sitting ducks if a sniper perched among the loblolly pine and oak trees lining the front and side yards.

Larrick’s reply came in equal measure of soft tones. “Either that or a large flock of birds dropped in recently to help her redecorate. Great detective work.”

“Bird droppings are—”

“Are sought after for facials. Especially the Japanese Nightingale shit.”

“Only you would know that.” Ethan adjusted his tie, an acknowledgment of the apprehension filling his mind.
“Are we whispering because your paranoid gut can’t assimilate food well enough to distinguish indigestion from an outside threat? This woman lives alone, gonna think we’re a couple of perverts and be liable to shoot us.”

“Word has it she’s a pacifist.”

“Fine. You’re one to talk about signs—dragging my ass to a stranger’s house at this ungodly morning hour to knock on the door and ask, ‘Lady, are you all right? We’re police detectives who received an anonymous tip you might have a hangnail. Perhaps we could lend you a pair of nail clippers?’” Derision and humor warred for dominance in Larrick’s tone, yet his sharp gaze continually scanned the perimeter in consideration of his partner’s unarticulated hunch. Yin and yang, they fit together, a clean-cut detective and his partner whose hair length had passed regulation specs weeks ago.

“You know this isn’t the first tip we’ve gotten, not to mention the fact that the other leads were solid and led to arrests. And while we’re at it, why don’t you step to the side? Standard police procedure when approaching an unknown situation.” Ethan turned sideways, standing by the door with his hand poised to knock on the solid oak. He hesitated. Moisture coated his palms, a rare occurrence. Scrutinizing the interior through the door’s narrow sidelights yielded nothing more than expected. Elegantly upholstered furniture, gleaming hardwood floors, and delicate bric-a-brac adorning the thick mantle and each side table completed the sophisticated picture. “Don’t see any problem. Maybe she’s fallen and can’t get to a phone.”

“You expected an old lady brandishing her curling iron? As for leads, I get mine from three-dimensional people while you get yours from a bunch of ones and zeroes. Why can’t our IT department trace your anonymous texts further than the loony bin? Though that’s probably appropriate, since your secret admirer’s last present consisted of a flower basket bigger than my TV, along with fur-lined cuffs. I’ve never laughed so hard I pissed myself. I thought that was hogwash, a myth made up by old ladies.” Larrick leaned over the iron railing to peer through the window. “Can’t see squat, bottom sill’s too high.”

“As my partner, you’re supposed to have my back, not stab me in the back. You didn’t have to broadcast it through the whole department by hanging the cuffs from the sprinkler system with a bunch of roses twined in them. Now my brothers won’t let up, and I’ve been subscribed to every kinky magazine known to the publishing world. You think I should know why some whacko chose me for their personal marionette?” Ethan suppressed a shudder before his partner gained more verbal ammunition. If his suspicions were correct, his informant was, in fact, a beautiful enigma with waist-length, chestnut hair and an emerald gaze capable of melting steel.

“Maybe because you were the youngest to make detective? Rising star, golden boy, and all that shit.”

“No. Probably afraid your redneck ways would rub off on them, or maybe because I’m the biggest sap.” Ethan’s gut rumbled, more of a warning sign from a well-heeled intuition than hunger. “Larrick, this doesn’t feel right.” Behind him, the slide of metal on leather let him know his partner just palmed his Glock. Three years of working together circumvented the formality of dissecting gut reactions.

A creak of leather sole betrayed Larrick’s backtracking to scrutinize the surroundings. “Side windows are lower. I’ll take a look.”

“Hood of her BMW is cold. Didn’t go anywhere recently.” Larrick’s harsh whisper halted a nearby squirrel scampering up a tree, its head cocked to one side while studying the strange human interlopers.

Sunshine warmed the first spring buds on the low shrubbery bordering the walkway to complete the idyllic setting. Nothing but peace and serenity, yet Ethan’s heart hammered against his ribcage like an aggressive punk drummer. With his partner disappearing around the corner, he again scanned the perimeter while the morning’s corrupted equanimity formed a sour wad in his chest. A lazy March breeze combed its cool fingers through his short hair while the deep foreboding received with the initial text message blossomed into multiple horrific scenarios, leaving one of them a corpse, their life’s essence forming macabre shapes on gleaming hardwood floors.

“I see bare feet beyond the kitchen island. Toes up. Probably female.” Larrick’s disembodied whisper just provided probable cause. “Backup?”




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A Dark Prequel to Digital Velocity

Theft of spirit is no one’s birthright.

A quirk of her X chromosome furnished Alexis with an edge few others enjoyed. After fate plunged her into orphan status and an intolerable foster home forced her to the streets, a group of prostitutes sheltered her from their vicious pimp. Seeing something special within, they nurtured and shielded her from their harsh reality until she could forge her own path in life.

Destiny frequently takes us back to our roots. Lexi’s return journey begins when a serial killer attacks one of her adopted sisters. Relying on courage and wit, she must stay a step ahead and secure evidence to free her family from a psychopathic murderer.



Reily’s employment as an ICU nurse, private investigator, and work in the military police has given her countless experiences in a host of different environments to add a real world feel to her fiction.

Though her kids are her life, writing is Reily’s life after. The one enjoyed…after the kids are in bed or after they’re in school and the house is quiet. This is the time she kicks back with laptop and lapdog to give her imagination free rein.

In life, hobbies can come and go according to our physical abilities, but you can always enjoy a good book. Life isn’t perfect, but our imaginations can be. Relax, whether it’s in front of a fire or in your own personal dungeon. Take pleasure in a mental pause as you root for your favorite hero/heroine and bask in their accomplishments, then share your opinions of them over a coffee with your best friend (even if he’s four legged). Life is short. Cherish your time.

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          Review: ELEMENTARY - BLOOD AND INK        
ELEMENTARY: BLOOD AND INK by Adam Christopher (Titan Books, 2016)

Reviewed by Alyson Baker

The Chief Financial Officer of a secretive NYC hedge fund has been found murdered—stabbed through the eye with an expensive fountain pen. When Sherlock Holmes and Joan Watson discover a link between the victim and a charismatic management guru with a doubtful past, it seems they may have their man. But is the guru being framed? 

As secrets are revealed and another victim is found murdered in the same grisly fashion, Holmes and Watson begin to uncover a murky world of money and deceit…

I was thrilled I was going to be able to review a Sherlock Holmes novel written by a Kiwi. And Blood and Ink started off well enough – but this Sherlock Holmes is the one from the television series Elementary, and as the story progressed it became obvious he doesn’t have much in common with the classic Holmes.

In fact, the only two examples of Holmesian deduction in the book – where Holmes deduces specific facts about people with seemingly supernatural insight, and then explains his method as a series of fine observations – lacked the latter part of the device, ie we have no idea how he knew what he knew as Watson “having worked with Holmes for so long … simply took his observation, deduction, induction, whatever it was, on face value”.

Holmes isn’t really at the centre of this story of financial espionage at all – he is just part of a team with Joan Watson and NYPD’s Captain Gregson and Detective Bell. The story is almost exclusively told from the point of view of Watson; the main contribution Holmes makes to solving the case comes via a group of dark net hackers whom Holmes pays for information with online Monty Python performances!

The mystery itself is OK – the CFO of a top New York hedge fund is found dead in a seedy hotel with an exceedingly expensive fountain pen stuck through his eye and into his brain. It is soon clear to both the characters and the reader that the ‘obvious’ suspect is being framed – and there are a few twists and turns before a solution is reached – but the end isn’t a surprise and the arc of the storytelling quite flat.

As I don’t watch the television series I can’t say how faithful this book is to its Holmes and Watson – I just know that not only is it set in a different city and a different time from the original Holmes – it is part of a different literary universe.

Alyson Baker is a crime-loving librarian in Nelson. This review first appeared on her blog, which you can check out here

          [Savant] AFMar Low 964..back up to about 968...several opinions... ====== Following a ...        

AFMar Low 964..back up to about 968...several opinions...
======
Following a report this evening of better-than-expected Q2 revenue and profit by Alphabet ( GOOGL), chief financial officer Ruth Porat, and Google CEO Sundar Pichai held a conference call with analysts to discuss the report. The stock is down $32.21, or 3%, at $966.10, in late trading. Port said the report reflected "tremendous results in mobile search with a strong contribution from YouTube." Reports from the Street are starting to come in. In any early read on the results, R.W. Baird analyst Colin Sebastian, who has an Outperform rating on the shares, and a $1,100 price target, writes that most everything was in line with his expectations, and with consensus. However, he does note that the GGAP EPS was helped by a lower tax rate, and by higher interest and other income. Similarly, Brian Weiser of Pivotal Research, who has a Hold rating on the shares, notes most things were as expected or better, but that higher costs to acquire customers, known as " TAC," brought down profit margin. "Margin erosion was a modest negative for the quarter," he writes. Looking at costs, TAC to network members rose to represent 71.6% of network revenue -- up significantly sequentially and the highest for any quarter since 2009. TAC to network partners grew by +16%, the fastest pace of growth since 2012. Management attributed growth in this expense line item to higher TAC rates associated with mobile sites and programmatic buying. We note that while Google's Network Members' properties historically related to a network that absorbed demand from search budgets or performance-based advertising, in recent years this line has come to relate to revenues associated with Google's programmatic display and video network GDN as well as the legacy AdMob. It appears that product mixes including the changes in the kinds of inventory that Google sells via its networks (for example brand safe and viewable ad inventory, especially including video) could be causing Google to incur higher costs than was previously the case. Google's TAC for distribution partners, including mobile operators, "was also up substantially." As a consequence, his estimates are "reduced slightly" for the "long term" for profit margin, he writes, more than the amount by which his revenue estimate is going up. And, he now values the shares at $940 versus $980 previously. More at Barron's Tech Trader Daily blog, barrons.com
----------------
Google's parent company Alphabet Inc. posted yet another period of strong growth in the second quarter, with revenue jumping 21% to $26 billion. The results suggest Google's ad business is humming along nicely despite recent concerns from some advertisers about where it's been placing their ads. Here are the most important advertising-related takeaways from the search giant's earnings conference call: What brand safety issues? So far, there's no evidence that Google's recent "brand safety" challenges have had an impact on its ad business. The company came under fire in March for allowing ads to run alongside objectionable content -- including extremist video on YouTube -- prompting major advertisers including Wal-Mart Stores Inc., AT&T Inc. and J.P. Morgan Chase & Co. to say they held back spending from YouTube and other Google services. Some advertisers say have since returned to YouTube, while others say they have stayed away. Google made no reference to the issue on its earnings call this time around, with Alphabet CFO Ruth Porat stating instead that YouTube made a "healthy contribution" to its ad revenue growth between April and June. CEO Sundar Pichai said "hundreds of brands" are now buying video ads through its Google Preferred product, which it says places alongside YouTube's most premium content. YouTube hits the living room Much has been made about the potential for digital video services such as YouTube to displace traditional TV, and Google says it's making some progress when it comes to grabbing users' attention in the living room. Google CEO Sundar Pichai said the fastest growing screen for YouTube is in the living room, and noted that YouTube now has 1.5 billion monthly viewers across all devices, with an average viewing time of 60 minutes a day. The company launched its own over-the-top linear TV service, YouTube TV, earlier this year. Mobile search is booming Industry observers once questioned Google's reliance on desktop search and its ability to shift its business to mobile. According to Google, that transition is going great, with "tremendous results in mobile" search now helping to drive its ad revenue growth. "We're really pleased with our ongoing efforts there," Ms. Porat said, adding that there's no single change that is helping to drive its business on that front beyond growing user adoption. "It's a lot of small incremental efforts that in aggregate continue to allow us to benefit from a really nice underlying secular trend," she said. Connecting online to offline is still a big opportunity Google and its competitors have for years attempted to understand the link between users' online behaviors and their offline actions and purchases. According to Mr. Pichai, the company continues to see that area as a big opportunity for Google. "With 90% of transactions still happening offline, we want to help consumers find what they're looking for in brick and mortar stores," he said. Write to Jack Marshall at Jack.Marshall@wsj.com
-------------
Opinion: Alphabet continues to avoid disclosing performance of YouTube and other important businesses YouTube has over 1.5 billion monthly viewers amid a hot market for video advertising, and is likely Alphabet Inc.'s second biggest business after Google's core internet search business. But in Alphabet's second quarter results on Monday (http://www.marketwatch.com/story/alphabet-reports-second-quarter-earnings-beat-2017-07-24), the overall Google business still did not include a break-out of YouTube's financial performance, to the detriment of investors. Alphabet (GOOGL) (GOOGL) bundles YouTube results in its overall Google properties advertising revenue, which soared nearly 20% from a year ago to $18.4 billion. Google says in regulatory filings that its "Google properties revenue" consists primarily of advertising sales generated on Google's website and app, YouTube, and other Google-owned and -operated properties like Gmail, Google Maps and Google Play. YouTube is clearly the star right now beyond search, however, based on the attention executives gave to the video site in Monday's earnings call (http://blogs.marketwatch.com/thetell/2017/07/24/alphabet-earnings-likely-to-focus-on-youtube-after-big-fine-live-blog/)--YouTube was mentioned 25 times, according to a rough transcript of the call, challenging the word "search" (32 times) and dominating Google Play and Gmail (three times apiece) as well as Maps (seven times). "The biggest contributors to growth again this quarter were mobile search and YouTube," Chief Financial Officer Ruth Porat said. Don't miss: 'Dark Net' could threaten Google and Facebook (http://www.marketwatch.com/story/rising-dark-net-may-spell-trouble-for-google-facebook-says-goldman-2017-07-13) Google Chief Executive Sundar Pichai, who joined Alphabet's board Monday, also focused on the video site, discussing the 1.5 billion users and saying that they watched on average an hour a day of YouTube on phones and tablets. But that shows one of the problems in disclosing these types of metrics in conference calls with general terminology: Was that just mobile viewing? We may never know, since Google does not disclose these metrics in terms that it defines somewhere for investors to find. In addition, new revenue-recognition rules that Alphabet has already adopted suggest that Alphabet should be disclosing YouTube results (http://www.marketwatch.com/story/alphabet-earnings-a-274-billion-hit-for-google-potential-youtube-results-for-investors-2017-07-21). The rules call for companies to disclose results as they are being reported to the chief decision maker, and Porat's statements about growth suggest that there are certainly YouTube results floating around the company's C-suite. Alphabet's lack of hard data behind its offerings is annoying, but it could also be detrimental to its stock. Investors may have found a reason to bid Google's stock price higher with hard data showing YouTube's growth Monday, but instead they seemed to focus on the falling cost-per-clicks, or CPC, metric (http://www.marketwatch.com/story/googles-growth-in-mobile-ads-hurts-results-2014-04-16) and increasing traffic-acquisition costs, or TAC. Google's CPC fell 23% in the quarter, compared with a drop of 7% in the same period a year ago, while TAC increased to 22% of advertising revenue from 21% a year ago, a combination that could be worrisome for Alphabet. Beyond standard revenue and earnings, both of which beat expectations handily in Monday's report, and some limited segmentation, that alphabet soup of acronyms are about the only metrics of consequence that Alphabet shares with the public. They seemed to have an effect Monday: Despite the earnings beat, Alphabet stock fell about 3% in after-hours trading, after gaining 13.6% in the previous three months to outperform the S&P 500 index , which added 4% in that time. This is a company, though, that loves to be vague. Ever since it went public, Google/Alphabet has not given investors any kind of financial guidance or helpful outlook because the company's founders, Alphabet CEO Larry Page and Sergey Brin, do not want investors to have a mentality focused on quarterly results. So investors, without much else additional info beyond a breakout of Alphabet's money-losing "Other Bets" segment, will continue to focus on an opaque bucket of revenue and wonky advertising metrics that would make most eyes glaze over. If Alphabet wants to celebrate its growing businesses--such as YouTube and Google Cloud--as much as executives did in Monday's conference call, it needs to provide some real numbers in a standardized manner. It might be pleasantly surprised by the results. -Therese Poletti; 415-439-6400; AskNewswires@dowjones.com

          What I Read in June        

June was such a beautiful month for my family.  My youngest brother, the baby of the family, married his college sweetheart in a beautiful ceremony in east Tennessee.  We got to see all of our extended family and some Arkansas friends that we haven't seen in years.  It such a special trip and such a blessing to add another sister to our family.  A lot of people asked me if, given my recent divorce, it was hard on me, but the truth is that Andrew is kind of my pet sibling and I was so happy to see him happy that it wasn't difficult at all.  My older brother and his wife and children came and it is always a treat to see them.

June was also a very good month for me in terms of reading.  I got a lot accomplished and I'm feeling like I'm finally getting my feet back under me when it comes to reading and enjoying books.  Here's what I read:

Clean My Space by Melissa Maker
The Fireman by Joe Hill
Brave New Girl: How to Be Fearless by Lou Hamilton
Snow Blind by Ollie Masters
Best Enemies by Jane Heller
Roses and Rot by Kat Howard
Hello Tokyo by Ebony Bizys
The Blessing of Humility by Jeff Bridges
The Only Child by Andrew Pyper
Liturgy of the Ordinary by Tish Harrison Warren (for the second time this year)
Drawing Calm by Susan Evenson
My Secret by Frank Warren
A Lifetime of Secrets by Frank Warren
Housekeeping by Marilynne Robinson
Penance by Kanae Minato
The Dark Net by Jamie Bartlett
Sex Object by Jessica Valente
Relish by Lucy Knisley

What did you read in June?
          Shorties (Hilton Als Remembered Sam Shepard, Tom Waits' Acting Career, and more)        

Hilton Als on Sam Shepard at the New Yorker.


Oscilloscope examined the acting career of Tom Waits.


Jawbreaker played its first live show in 21 years.


Vox interviewed author Celeste Ng.


Stream a new Gogol Bordello song.


The Oxford American shared an excerpt from jesmyn Ward's forthcoming novel Sing, Unburied, Sing.


Drowned in Sound interviewed singer-songwriter Briana Marela.


The New York Review of Books reviewed several new books about Henry David Thoreau.


Charly Bliss covered Len's "Steal My Sunshine."


The shortlist for the 2017 Not the Booker Prize has been announced.


Paste interviewed singer-songwriter Billy Bragg.


Bustle listed upcoming book-to-television adaptations.


Stream a new Destroyer song.


The Creative Independent interviewed poet Matthew Zapruder.


Todd Haynes is making a new Velvet Underground documentary.


Literary Hub shared an excerpt from Benjamin Percy's novel The Dark Net.


Stream a new Small Circle song.


Book Riot recommended short books by literary giants.


Guitar World profiled Adam Granduciel of the War on Drugs.


The Rumpus shared an excerpt from Matthew Gallaway's novel #gods.


Stream a new Bodies of Water song.


Jonathan Hennessey explained why he writes graphic nonfiction at Signature.


SPIN profiled Japanese Breakfast's Michelle Zauner.


BookPage interviewed author Kamila Shamsie .


Stream a new Frankie Rose song.


Publishers Weekly profiled author Mike MacCormack.


Aquarium Drunkard interviewed musician Steve Wynn.


eBooks on sale for $0.99 today:

Benazir Bhutto: Favored Daughter by Brooke Allen
J.D. Salinger: The Escape Artist by Thomas Beller
The Lost Tribe of Coney Island by Claire Prentice
Lucian Freud: Eyes Wide Open by Phoebe Hoban
Men, Women & Children by Chad Kultgen

eBooks on sale for $1.99 today:

The Blazing World by Siri Hustvedt
The Family Fang by Kevin Wilson
Girl Through Glass by Sari Wilson
The Impossible Lives of Greta Wells by Andrew Sean Greer
Island Beneath the Sea by Isabel Allende
Jailbird by Kurt Vonnegut
A Land More Kind Than Home by Wiley Cash
Life Among Giants by Bill Roorbach
Red Moon by Benjamin Percy
The Small Backs of Children by Lidia Yuknavitch
A Small Revolution by Jimin Han
This Is Your Life, Harriet Chance! by Jonathan Evison
You Too Can Have a Body Like Mine by Alexandra Kleeman

eBooks on sale for $2.99 today:

Broken Verses by Kamila Shamsie
The Child in Time by Ian McEwan
The Comfort of Strangers by Ian McEwan
The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers
Inferno by Eileen Myles
The Sunlit Room by Rebecca Dinerstein
Visible City by Tova Mirvis


eBooks on sale for $3.99 today:

The Beautiful Bureaucrat by Helen Phillips
Broken Glass by Alain Mabanckou
A Complicated Kindness by Miriam Toews
Lightning People by Christopher Bollen
The River Why by David James Duncan
The Theoretical Foot by M. F. K. Fisher


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)
weekly music release lists


          Free Talk Live 2017-07-23        
Brutal Dark Net Market Crackdown Globally :: FBI Believes Darknet Markets Run By Traditional Drug Dealers :: Moving Up the Drug Chain :: Citizenship :: Love of Power :: Alphabay Takedown :: Minimum Wage :: Altcoins and ICO Hucksters :: Dishwasher :: Jonny Ray Walks Out of War for Planet of the Apes :: HOSTS - Ian, Mark, Jonny Ray
          JCC Bomb-Threat Suspect Had a Client        
(Atlantic) Emma Green - A federal court has unsealed new documents in the case against Israeli teenager Michael Kadar, who has been accused of making at least 245 threatening calls to Jewish Community Centers and schools around the U.S. According to the documents, Kadar advertised a "School Email Bomb Threat Service" on AlphaBay, an online "dark net" marketplace that was shut down by the federal government in July. Authorities have identified an individual in California who allegedly ordered and paid for at least some of Kadar's threats.
          Dark Net, magazinul virtual pentru traficanÅ£i şi terorişti        
Se pot cumpăra droguri, arme, angaja asasini plătiţi sau plăti răscumpărări pentru răpiri. Este magazinul online al crimei organizate. Totul se întâmplă pe internet, într-o zonă ascunsă numită Dark Net. O piaţă care a explodat în ultimii ani şi care a ajuns la tranzacţii care depăşesc un miliard de dolari într-un an. România nu este ocolită de acest fenomen. Hackeri români au fost prinşi tranzacţionând pe piaţa unde clienţii fideli sunt criminalii şi teroriştii.
          Nationwide police raids yield drugs after dark net investigation        
A series of nationwide raids by police have seized a large quantity of psychoactive drugs, including more than 10kg of synthetic cannabis. The psychoactive substances found by police could have been used to manufacture 150kg of synthetic...
          Whitman Reading Notes for Nov 6–12        

I’ve been throwing a lot of my thoughts into “dark networks” and other closed or ephemeral places lately. I regret that. Some stuff has gone into class notes, only in verbal discussion, at my 750words.com page, or in emails to friends. Maybe if I have a slow-going week, I’ll go through as much as I can to publish that here. Might not be until the semester ends at this rate, though.

Things are really, really busy, and I expect them to get busier. Coming up on the weekend of both the Chicago Colloquium and ChiTAG, the latter of which we’ll be hosting a friend for. That’s also birthday weekend for Raina and me. After that’s Thanksgiving and Chicago Loot Drop’s double-feature fundraiser. Meanwhile, there are plenty of things to write and read for class, all the GWJ daily editing and scheduling, and then there’s the regular 40-hours (where things are exciting, potentially—more if things develop). Oh, and my mom’s cancer is back.

Anyway, to the subject at hand. This is a blog, not a … . Well, I don’t need to make this an example to reinforce bad stereotypes.

So I’ve now read some stuff from the people running this show that gives me an idea about the best way to approach the Whitman Archive. I’ve done some tooling around on my own — reading a poem in a couple different versions, reading one edition through a few poems — but the presentation is drastically different from the straightforward and fairly linear (if heavily annotated) presentation of a printed critical edition. And the comparison work isn’t readily done for me ahead of time as a user. It’s more an awkward sort of firehose of data when approached this way. My devious plot is to read some literary crit that takes a Whitman poem as its subject, and to use that to pull out claims about the text. Sort of scanning them to pull out the factual claims.Then I can bring those statements to the archive, the way one might bring queries to a database. Seems the right way to approach that sort of beast.

So here’s a list of links to criticism, provided by the Whitman Archive. I don’t know if I’ll get through them all, or if some won’t interest me, but I really only need a few for the purposes of this project. These aren’t pulled with too much thought to them; I’m just drafting a list to plow through. (As with the variants, presentation divides things chronologically, in this case between contemporary reviews and later crit.)

Reviews from Whitman’s contemporaries:

  1. "Bardic Symbols."
  2. [Review of "After All, Not to Create Only"]
  3. Three responses to "A Child's Reminiscence"

More recent crit.:

Here's the master list of lit. criticism.
  1. Kenneth Price's To Walt Whitman, America (Price is the archive's co-... co-curator?
  2. Whitman East & West (collection)
  3. Constructing The German Walt Whitman
  4. Walt Whitman and the Earth: A Study in Ecopoetics
  5. Walt Whitman & the Irish
  6. Walt Whitman & The Class Struggle
  7. The Pragmatic Whitman: Reimagining American Democracy
  8. The Continuing Presence of WW
  9. ... A Mosaic of Interpretations

Not a lot of work done in just gathering links, I feel, but it’s a start.


Here is some news that I want to look into, but haven't yet.

In Other News

I feel like I’m a snow plow that’s pushing too much to shove ahead of me. Hopefully I can knock some things off, or realize that there’s less ahead than I thought (unlikely; so many papers to write!).


          The Dark Net        
The Dark Net
author: Benjamin Percy
name: Michelle
average rating: 3.60
book published: 2017
rating: 0
read at:
date added: 2017/05/10
shelves: to-read
review:


          Feds Shutter 2 Online Drug Markets; Dealers Move to a 3rd        
Hours after Attorney General Jeff Sessions touted the demise of two "dark net" drugs sites, AlphaBay and Hansa, dealers began migrating to another, DreamMarket. The scenario highlights the whack-a-mole challenges of policing drugs sold online.
          Review: The Dark Net by Benjamin Percy        

Set in present-day Portland, The Dark Net by Benjamin Percy is a cracked-mirror version of the digital nightmare we already live in, a timely and wildly imaginative techno-thriller about the evil that lurks in real and virtual spaces, and the power of a united few to fight back (available August 1, 2017).

Benjamin Percy’s The Dark Net melds modern-day technology—specifically the murkiest parts of the internet and the pervasive interconnectedness of humanity and digital content—with good old-fashioned horror writing to create a gruesome vision of demons tearing through both physical and digital Portland, Oregon. An ancient evil is gathering its might in the bowels of the internet, ready to unleash havoc on Zero Day. If all goes to plan, Portland will become the staging ground for spreading a digital infection to the rest of the world, ushering in a hell on earth that will doom humankind.

Humanity is not without its champions, though. There is Hannah, whose blindness might be cured by a cutting-edge technology that could also transform her into something more than human. There is Mike, a former child evangelist who is trying to atone for the greed and duplicity of his former life by sheltering the homeless and building up an arsenal of weaponry. There is Sarin, a woman who’s cheated death for so long no one can remember how old she really is. There is Lump, a deformed street preacher with a seemingly mystical command of crows.

[Read Doreen Sheridan's review of The Dark Net...]

Read the full article


          World Views: May 16, 2014        

Suzette Grillot starts a month-long European trip in London, and talks about Turkey's coal mine disaster and how that relate's to the United Kingdom's energy industry with University of Oklahoma Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students Clarke Stroud.

Later, Rebecca Cruise discusses so-called 'dark networks' with University of Arizona political scientist H. Brinton Milward.


          Get Booked Ep. #92: Welcome To The Cliffhanger        

Amanda and Jenn discuss historical fiction, quests, funny books, and more in this week's episode of Get Booked.

This episode is sponsored by The Dark Net by Benjamin Percy and Impossible Views of the World by Lucy Ives.

Subscribe to the podcast via RSS here, or via Apple Podcast here.
The show can also be found on Stitcher here.

 

Questions

 

1. Hi Ladies!
I am about to set off for a yearlong adventure as an au pair in Paris, so I have two requests, one difficult and one easy. My first request is for book recommendations for the two girls who I will be taking care of. I would like to bring them something when I arrive (a shameless bribe) and books are easy to transport. The older one is 10 and is an avid reader and has read the first Harry Potter book in English. She had some struggles, but reads about the same as an American 10 year old. I'd love to get her a chapter book so I can help out with her reading and so she can feel super accomplished. She's a huge Harry Potter fan and also likes graphic novels.

The younger girl is almost 9 and reads more like a first grader. She is not a reader but will sometimes pick up graphic novels. I'd love to find something cool to strike up her interest in learning English since according to her mother and previous au pairs, she understands spoken English, but has a tough time reading and speaking it. She is much more active and likes sports and board games.
My second request should be easy. I'd love some books to get me psyched up for the big move. Ideally, a fish out of water story set in Paris, either fiction or non fiction is fine. I loved Paris for One and Bringing Up Bebe and Me Talk Pretty One Day. I found Paris to the Moon a little tedious and My Life in France is already on my list. My favorite books are A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, Station Eleven and The Bone Clocks.
Thanks!
--Jennie

 

2. Hi Jenn and Amanda!

Love this show so much, my TBR grows exponentially after each episode.

I'm looking for some book recommendations for my younger sister, who is a bit of a reluctant reader but would like to read more because when she finds a book she she genuinely loves, she can't put it down or stop talking about it and I want to help nurture her inner book nerd.

She likes historical fiction, and in particular books that follow a woman's life over a long period of time. She prefers books set far in the past, like 300 years plus to ancient history, and has expressed that she would like books that deal less with "mainstream western history."

Two books she has really loved are The Red Tent by Anita Diamant and The Book of Negroes by Lawrence Hill, and we both loved chatting about these books together.

I'd love to pass along some more similar suggestions to her so we can do sister read-a-longs and book chats.

Thanks so very much!
--Kate

 

3. Hello Get Booked,

I've just finished the latest entry in Kristin Britain's Green Rider series and now have 3-4 long years to wait for the next one.

I'm wondering if you can recommend me some 'woman goes on a quest/journey through a fantasy land' books to make the wait easier.

(While I don't mind a bit of pain and suffering on the way, I'm not a fan of relentlessy grim stories.)

I've already read everything by:
Robin McKinley
Tamora Pierce
Tanya Huff

Thanks in advance.
--Marie

 

4. Hey ladies!

I'm looking for fiction (or even nonfiction) recommendations for books involving scientists and adventure. I've read The Signature of All Things, and The Lost City of Z, I really enjoyed both of those. I have also read The Unseen World, books similar to that are also welcome. I love science and history so anything historical is also a bonus. Thanks so much, I love the podcast!
--Kristy

 

5. My older brother is an enthusiastic reader and I read all the time. He still lives in our hometown in rural Wisconsin and I live in Boston. We've recently started building an adult relationship by talking about books. I want to introduce him to more diverse books. My brother's favorite books are To Kill a Mockingbird and Lonesome Dove, we read The Winter of Our Discontent together and he loved it. He takes his time reading, so it has to be something that will keep him interested over time. I want to expose him to more women/poc authors without alienating him.
--Sarah

 

6. Hello Amanda and Jenn,

I have always really enjoyed reading aloud (that is, as an adult reading aloud to other adults). With my parents, I have read the entire Harry Potter series and many Jasper Fforde books and found them especially enjoyable to share because of the cleverness and humor. However, I am now in a relationship with a man who not really a book person (and, yes, it took a lot for me to trust a man with no bookshelves in his home). He has indulged my interest in reading to him, but we have not found many books that appeal to him. We enjoyed The Cheese Monkeys by Chip Kidd (one of my absolute favorites since I attended art school) and Daisy Fay and The Miracle Man by Fannie Flagg. I wanted to revisit Jasper Fforde with him but he is vehemently opposed to all things fantasy/sci fi (even magical realism). Any suggestions for books that would have that kind of smart Jasper Fforde humor but be more grounded in the real world?

I actually submitted this request close to a year ago and (unless I missed it somehow), it has not appeared on the show. In that time, the relationship I mentioned has turned into an engagement. So, as I look forward to spending the rest of my life with this non-reader, I would really appreciate some brilliant inspirations for read-alouds that will help me share my love of books with him.

Thanks,
--Sasha

 

7. Hello Amanda and Jenn!

I recently read Malinche by Laura Esquivel and, while I wasn't actually a big fan of it (her writing style just didn't do it for me), it left me hungry for more historical fiction that takes place in Mexico and Central America. I would love books that are Pre-Columbian, preferably written by people who are Latinx, and where the place/culture is a character. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks!
--Heidi

 

8. I recently finished an advanced degree and am starting my own business. Thanks to some major hits to my self-confidence and some pretty significant imposter syndrome, I'm finding myself hesitant to move forward. I need to feel inspired and need a major confidence boost--but I can't stand self-help books or anything that sounds like a self-help book. They make me roll my eyes and sometimes get thrown in disgust. I need to be inspired, not just told I should be inspired or fed a bunch of woo-woo bs. I hated Eat, Pray, Love with a passion hotter than a thousand suns, if that helps (and side note: I'm always glad to find those who felt the same way since at the time everyone else loved it). I'm open to fiction or non-fiction. Please help me find something to distract me from wondering who in the hell actually gave me me a law degree & licence and that will make me feel worthy. Thanks!

(As another side note, I'm also a former bookseller who desperately misses being in the know, so I'm loving all of the Book Riot's podcasts!)

--NoName Because of Reasons

 

 

Books Discussed

Cast in Shadow by Michelle Sagara

When Dimple Met Rishi by Sandhya Menon

Roller Girl by Victoria Jamieson

Dud Avocado by Helen Dundy

See What I Have Done by Sarah Schmidt

Mountain of Light by Indu Sundaresan

Tombs of Atuan by Ursula LeGuin

Labyrinth Lost by Zoraida Córdova

Journey to the Center of the Earth by Jules Verne

A Guide for the Perplexed by Dara Horn

Four Souls by Louise Erdrich

Behold the Dreamers by Imbolo Mbue

David Sedaris, literally anything, who cares (Me Talk Pretty One Day)

Three Men in a Boat by Jerome K Jerome

Funny books flow chart from Slate

Ines of My Soul by Isabel Allende, translated by Margaret Sayers Peden

Servant of the Underworld (Obsidian & Blood series #1) by Aliette de Bodard
(writing outside her own culture)

Girl Up by Laura Bates

Grit by Angela Duckworth


          Check Out the Trailer for Tonight’s ‘Dark Net’ Premiere on Showtime!        

The docu-series trend is one of the most popular on television at the moment (thanks to the success of HBO’s The Jinx: The Life and Deaths of Robert Durst, Netflix’s Making a Murderer, and the Serial podcast), and Showtime looks to jump into the fray with their new series Dark Net, an unscripted series premiering tonight (January 21) that takes an up-close look at a digitally connected world. The show is described by the network as follows: The eight-part docuseries explores the netherworld where virtual and physical lives collide in ways surprising, disturbing, and seemingly inevitable. With society’s growing dependence on technology, the

Check Out the Trailer for Tonight’s ‘Dark Net’ Premiere on Showtime!


          Docs: Bomb threats suspect offered services on dark net        

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. authorities say an American-Israeli Jew charged with threatening to bomb Jewish community centers and schools across the United States had offered to sell his threat-making services through an online black market. Recently unsealed court documents link 18-year-old Michael Kadar to a posting on the now-shuttered illicit marketplace AlphaBay advertising a “School […]

The post Docs: Bomb threats suspect offered services on dark net appeared first on ABC 36 News.


          The Dark Net: Inside the Digital Underworld        
The Dark Net: Inside the Digital Underworld
author: Jamie Bartlett
name: Anthony
average rating: 3.63
book published: 2014
rating: 2
read at:
date added: 2015/09/14
shelves: technology
review:


                  
Story time.

As a child I never spent an entire night in my own bed.  I shared a bed with my sister, but she of no comfort to me as she was littler than I.  Every night I would I would wake in the pitch black of my room and watch the shadows dance on the wall cast from the tree that hung outside my window.  It's long crackling branches would tap the old paned glass and I was sure something was out there, hoping I would open the window in curiosity and whatever this unknown monster was lurking out there, it was sure to snatch me and take me off to some dark netherworld.  I was convinced of this.  The long branches cast finger like shadows across the 1940s floral wallpaper in my room.  Perhaps they were the fingers of a witch, I thought.  So, after laying there terrified for what seemed like most of the night I would get out of bed and tip toe down the hall to my mother's bed.

And there I was safe, I knew.  Her room quiet and dark and most importantly free of witches, shadows, and strange noises.  All was well in the cocoon off her bed.  I would wrap my arms around her and press my ear against her back and listen to her breathing as she lay sleeping, not knowing I was there.  I would listen to all the gurgles and churnings inside of her.  I knew there was a city inside of her.  I imagined at night, when she was sleeping something very important was happening in the core of her body.  Little people were fast at work, building her up, making sure she was strong and able to take care of my sister and I.  I would hear the crash of a mini bulldozer knocking down an old wall and the hammering of a jack hammer fixing a street and all sorts of the usual sounds of building a city.  I would stay like that listening, and soon I would be fast asleep.

This is what I was sure it looked like inside of my mother:



Yesterday I finished a painting that I absolutely love.  It's titled 'One When We Were Flowers'

'Sweetest love, I do not go,
For weariness of thee,
Nor in hope the world can show
A fitter love for me;
But since that I
Must die at last, 'tis best
To use myself in jest
Thus by feign'd deaths to die.' ~ John Donne




what's knew in my life?  Well I am have been uber busy painting and lots of fantastic stuff is happening with that. I'm being featured in an art magazine, which I will blog about at a later date.  My sales are up and I'm happy to think of all of my art that is in private collections across North America.  I'm hoping to start expanding to over seas and have been networking with a magazine from the UK that is interested on doing a spread on me (more about that later).




Life is good, life is grand.  Love your friends, love your family, for you know which ones will always be there and make sure you cherish that, and cherish them.